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Monday 30 October / Tuesday 31 October 1922

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Monday 30 October 1922

TECHNICAL INSTRUCTION
CORK BOROUGH COMMITTEE

“At the meeting of the Cork Technical Instruction Committee at eight o’clock last night…the meeting had before it the …summary of Inspector’s report upon the working of the scheme of technical instruction in operation in the County Borough of Cork during the session 1921-1922.

Municipal School of Art: The work of the School of Art was carried on satisfactorily and on sound lines. Much good and valuable teaching was done in the full curriculum of a School of Art, including architecture, drawing from life and anatomy. The work of different classes was discussed with the headmaster on various visits of inspection, and, as a result, improvements in details were affected.

As a new design teacher has taken up work, it may be well to draw attention to the following: - The design and technique of lace and crochet done at the Cork School of Art have been remarkable for excellence for a good many years past; the technique continues to be excellent, but, as regards design, it has been remarked that there have been few new forms devised for some years”.

…The Chairman said that the comments on the School of Art were highly flattering and very praiseworthy. It was gratifying to see such an important branch of instruction was carried out so satisfactorily, and it was most creditable to the Principal (Mr. Charde) and the teachers.”

[source: Irish Examiner p8Tuesday 31 October 1922]

BOMBS IN PATRICK STREET

“Today shortly after twelve o’clock noon, there was yet another street bomb attack on troops in Cork, which from a military point of view, was the usual complete failure. The bombs missed their objective entirely and, as again, it was the defenceless civilian population, women and children, that were in danger as a result of the attack and not the National troops.

About a quarter of an hour after 12, a private touring car, containing three or four of the National Army was passing through Patrick Street, towards the Grand Parade, when just as it reached a point near the statue, the attack was made…

Two bombs were thrown...one of the bombs struck the wooden pavement almost in a line with the Irish Lace House [whilst] the larger bomb hit the iron work of a passing tram car …The passengers in the tram car were very naturally terrified, one of the lady occupants fainting and had to be assisted out of the car…It was a most miraculous circumstance that there had been no fatality or cases of serious injury following upon so atrocious a crime committed in broad daylight, and in one of the principal busy thoroughfares of the city”.

[source: Evening Echo p1Monday 30 October, 1922]

Tuesday 31 October 1922

ARRESTS EFFECTED

“The C.C.P. [City of Cork Police*] have been doing good work of late in the matter of apprehending robbers. Last night, James Caniffe, of 6 Emmet Place, was arrested on a charge of having on last Saturday entered the premises of Mr. Nolan, draper, Castle Street, and holding a revolver, stolen a blue nap overcoat. When taken into custody, the overcoat, and a revolver, were found in his possession.”

[source: Evening Echo p1Wednesday 1 November 1922]

“James Caniffe would be ‘returned for trial on the charge of robbery with violence on Wednesday 3 January.”

 [source: Irish Examiner p5  Thursday 4 January 1923]

*Following the signing of the [Anglo-Irish] Treaty in December 1921, there was a serious break-down of law and order in Cork City. Many police barracks had been sacked while others had been handed over to a group known as the Irish Republican Police, who wore an identifying arm-band with the letters I.R.P. They operated from barracks on the North Mall. The Corporation established its own unarmed police force known as the C.C.P. or City of Cork Police. The R.I.C. (Royal Irish Constabulary) were no longer regarded as having any authority but, pending final disbandment, still occupied some barracks. Meanwhile plans were well in train to form a new National police force and by March, 1922 recruits were already in training.

The final evacuation of the Bridewell Police Station [a two minute walk from Crawford Art Gallery along the quays] by the R.I.C. took place on 12 April 1922. An Inspector Riordan from Union Quay and Station-Sergeant McCoy met with I.R.A. officers in Cornmarket Street. An inventory of the station property was made and the building was handed over at 11:30 a.m. A similar operation was then conducted at Tuckey Street and Union Quay barracks. These were the last three R.I.C. barracks in the country to be evacuated.

[source: policehistory.com)

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Emmett Place, Cork, Ireland
T12 TNE6
Tel: 021 480 5042
info@crawfordartgallery.ie

Opening Hours
N.B. Last entry is 15 minutes before closing

Monday–Saturday 10.00am–5.00pm*
Thursday until 8.00pm

Sundays and Bank Holidays
11.00 am4.00pm

*Second floor closes 15 minutes before closing
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