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Your National Collection 2021

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New Acquisitions

Your National Collection 2021

Works by artists profiled in our 
#YourNationalCollection series this week:

 Angela Burchill, Katie, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Brian Maguire
Brian Maguire 'Arizona Border 3' (2020)
Courtesy of the Artist and Kerlin Gallery, Dublin.
Brian Maguire
Evgeniya Martirosyan
Evgeniya Martirosyan 'Chrysalis', 2020, 300 hand-stitched bicycle valves and two wall hooks. Courtesy of the Artist. Installation view in 'Under Skin 7', The Lab, Dublin by Louis Haugh.
Evgeniya Martirosyan
Danny McCarthy
Danny McCarthy, 'Found Sound (Lost at Sea 11.1.11'), 2011, sound installation. Installation shot at Crawford Art Gallery in 2011. Courtesy of the Artist.
Danny McCarthy
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The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media has been working with the National Cultural Institutions through the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to develop meaningful ways to support artists across the country at this challenging time. In October 2020, Minister Catherine Martin committed €1m from her department to Crawford Art Gallery and the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) to fund the purchase of artworks by artists living and/or working in Ireland. The investment enabled the two institutions charged with collecting contemporary art to work collaboratively to support artists by buying artworks to add to the National Collection.

The National Collection
The National Collection is the art collection of the State, which includes Crawford Art Gallery, IMMA, the National Gallery of Ireland, the Arts Council, and the Office of Public Works, for example. This acquisitions fund is therefore a major investment and vote of confidence in contemporary art, living artists, and the National Collection. As the cultural repositories for the country, the role of the National Cultural Institutions is to reflect Ireland and her people and tell the story of our country.

The Artworks
This is the first time in over a decade that substantial funding has been specifically allocated towards building the National Collection to reflect contemporary culture.The body of 422 artworks by 70 artists from across the country has been selected through a rigorous process by both institutions to ensure strategic and thoughtful acquisitions for the nation. Spanning from 1972 to 2021, the 225 works Crawford Art Gallery has acquired consist of paintings, photographic work, prints, drawings, sculpture, installations, moving image, sound work, film, digital work, embroidery and performance.

The Artists
Below is a list of the 39 artists whose work Crawford Art Gallery has acquired to add to the National Collection. We’ll be profiling each artist on this list on our social media channels and website over the coming weeks and months in our #YourNationalCollection series: stay tuned for updates.

Click on an artist's name to view more information

Aideen Barry, Sara Baume, Stephen Brandes, Angela Burchill, Declan Byrne, Elaine Byrne, Tom Climent, Yvonne Condon, Elizabeth Cope, Gary Coyle, Stephen Doyle, Rita Duffy, Amanda Dunsmore, Kevin Gaffney, Debbie Godsell, Michael Hanna, Marie Holohan, Katie Holten, Brianna Hurley, Andrew Kearney, John Keating, Fiona Kelly, Anne Kiely & Mary Palmer, Roseanne Lynch, Brian Maguire, Evgeniya Martirosyan, Danny McCarthy, Rosaleen Moore, Peter Nash, Ailbhe Ní Bhriain, Íde Ní Shúleabháin, Nuala O’Donovan, Sarah O’Flaherty, Tom O’Sullivan, Michael Quane, Jennifer Trouton, Charles Tyrrell, Daphne Wright.

#YourNationalCollection

Press release Art Acquisition Fund (Word Doc)

Aideen Barry

Aideen Barry: Not to be Known
Image: Still from Barry’s performative film ‘Not to be Known or Named’ (2015).

Aideen Barry AHRA is a practising visual artist based in Ireland with international representation. In 2020, she was elected as an Associated Member of the Royal Hibernian Academy. She is also a member of Aosdána and lectures in several universities and schools of visual art.

Originally commissioned by the Arts & Heritage Trust UK, ‘Not to be Known or Named’, the work joining Crawford Art Gallery’s collection, is what Barry calls a ‘performative film and an endurance performance piece’. It is a stop-motion film which shows the artist overwhelmed by the monotony and magnitude of domestic chores in nightmarish scenarios, exploring obsessional behaviour in the context of suburban normality. 

‘Having my work acquired by the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery is a huge moment in my life. Not only is it important for me to have my work in such a prestigious national and international collection but for me personally the Crawford was the first access point for me growing up in a working class community in Cork City. It was the one place I could go freely to access visual culture and that had a profound effect on my personal aspirations, artistic ambitions and development of my lingualism in the visual arts. This is of immense personal importance to me, but also this drive to support artists right now to be included in the collection marks a moment where this turbulent and traumatic time will be viewed as one of the most important civic investments the state has undertaken for visual art and for its citizens. We all benefit from moments like these.’

Photo: Aideen Barry. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Aideen Barry. Courtesy of the Artist.

Watch Barry discuss the background to ‘Not to be Known or Named’, now part of the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery:

Sara Baume

Image: Sara Baume, 'So sick and tired', 2020, courtesy of the artist and the National Sculpture Factory. Photo by Jed Niezgoda
'So sick and tired' is a new textwork/public artwork by artist and writer Sara Baume Commissioned by the National Sculpture Factory for Cork Midsummer Festival Midsummer Moments 2020. Photo credit: Jed Niezgoda / www.jedniezgoda.com

Sara Baume is a West Cork-based artist and writer, who studied fine art at Dun Laoghaire College of Art and Design (IADT). Her writing has appeared in publications including the Irish Times, the Guardian, the Stinging Fly, and Granta Magazine. Her first novel Spill Simmer Falter Wither was published to acclaim in 2015. In March 2020, her first non-fiction book, handiwork, appeared. 

‘So sick and tired’ is a textwork that was originally created for Midsummer Moments, a socially-distanced reimagining of the Cork Midsummer Festival. Baume was asked to craft a line of text in response to living in lockdown and had been fascinated by the rapid changes to the language of advertising and daily life that attended the outbreak of Covid-19.

Made in close collaboration with the National Sculpture Factory, it was initially displayed on the building’s red-brick exterior in the summer of 2020 and was Baume’s first piece of public art. Its neon tubing illuminated at sunset on the summer solstice in amber, chosen to reference the uncertainty of that colour within the traffic-light colour system familiar to all road-users.

Baume has described Crawford Art Gallery’s acquisition of this work as ‘the closing of a beautiful circle’, since Crawford Art Gallery is the first art gallery she ever visited as a young child on trips to the city with her mother. Watch her speak about this work and her connection to the gallery here:

Stephen Brandes

Image: Stephen Brandes, Todnauberg Puppet Set, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 70 x 80 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Stephen Brandes, Todnauberg Puppet Set, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 70 x 80 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Stephen Brandes, Chat Show, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 55 x78 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Stephen Brandes, Chat Show, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 55 x78 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Born in Wolverhampton, Stephen Brandes has lived and worked in Cork since 1993. He represented Ireland at the Venice Biennale 2005 as part of ‘Ireland at Venice’, and has shown in numerous exhibitions both in Ireland and internationally, including as part of the absurdist culinary performance group The Domestic Godless. He joins the National Collection with two additions to Crawford Art Gallery: “Todnauberg Puppet Set” and “Chat Show”.

In his own words:

“My practice includes collage, painting, monumental drawings, photography and video. I am not constrained by any particular medium. It is all underpinned by a fondness for European traditions of absurdism and satire and an interest in the emotive areas that exist between comedy and tragedy. Inspiration is drawn from art, design and film history as well as modern European history, literature, philosophy and travel. 

Both “Todnauberg Puppet Set” and “Chat Show” were made during the first months of lockdown in 2020. Unable to travel, I subscribed to an alternative movie library and watched a film each night as a substitute. Concurrently, I began painting again with no particular aim, other than to make funny, sad and ambiguous objects, built from misappropriated images and moments pulled from these films.

Inclusion in the National Collection is a validation for attempting to make a positive contribution, albeit in a modest way, to the nation’s cultural history. This is one job of an artist.”

Photo: Stephen Brandes, courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Stephen Brandes, courtesy of the Artist.

Angela Burchill

Angela Burchill Grid

Images: Row 1 (L-R):
Angela Burchill, Marie, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Angela Burchill, Katie, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Angela Burchill, Rosaleen, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Row 2 (L-R):
Angela Burchill, John Whelan, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Angela Burchill, Íde, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Angela Burchill, Ailbhe, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Row 3 (L-R):
Angela Burchill, John K, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Angela Burchill, Eoin, pencil & coloured pencil on board, 30 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Angela Burchill is from Bandon, Co. Cork. A prolific portrait artist, Angela works primarily with pastel pencils on paper and treated wood. In her own words: 'I like to work on portraits of my people in L'Arche because they are all my friends. It makes me happy to draw them because they are the people l live with, work with and share my life with.'

Her portraits are bold and highly-worked, showing an instinctive approach to pattern. They capture details of her friend's personalities with warmth, from Katie’s love of hearts which surround her, to Rosaleen working on a drawing of a dense cityscape.

Angela worked as an artist in residence at Mayfield Arts Centre for almost a decade as part of the Cúig studio programme and has exhibited her work at Crawford Art Gallery, Wandesford Quay Gallery, Cork, Southbank Centre, London, Gallerie Outsider Art, Amsterdam, Belconnel Arts Centre, Canberra, Paul Bardwell Gallery, Columbia, Galway Arts Centre, The Museum of Everything, London, HAI New York, Flat Iron Gallery, New York and Sirius Arts Centre, Cobh.

“I’m so delighted and happy that the gallery will have my work so that everybody can see my art; and the Crawford took my work to New York and when it’s in the gallery I will be famous.”

Angela is a member of Crawford Supported Studio. You can find out more about Crawford Supported Studio artists here.

Angela at work
Angela at work

Watch a video message from Angela here:

Declan Byrne

Image: Declan Byrne, Encrusted Dog, mixed media, 30 x 11 x 11 cm. Photo courtesy of KCAT Arts Centre.
Image: Declan Byrne, Encrusted Dog, mixed media, 30 x 11 x 11 cm. Photo courtesy of KCAT Arts Centre.

Declan Byrne has created a remarkable body of work since joining the Studio at KCAT Arts Centre in Callan, Co. Kilkenny in 2004.

A keen observer, Declan generally uses an object, a photograph or a reproduction of an artwork as inspiration for his work. He transforms the world he sees in a very detailed way, building up a drawing or painting from small sections of colours. Slowly, the ground is mapped out by bringing all the parts together in a completely new composition: in his practice he has clearly found a way of communicating.

In recent years he has also been expanding these processes into sculptural work. For his sculptural works, he carefully cuts pieces of dried acrylic paint found in painting pallets with scissors and glues these small pieces of colour to found objects – and this is the method by which Encrusted Dog, now part of the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery, was made.

Photo: Declan Byrne. Courtesy of KCAT Arts Centre.
Photo: Declan Byrne. Courtesy of KCAT Arts Centre.

Declan has shown his work widely internationally, including in Luxembourg, Finland, Germany, Australia, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the UK. He has also exhibited in Ireland at the Kilkenny Arts Festival, Dublin City Council Offices, Skibbereen Arts Festival and University College Cork. He has been involved in a number of exchanges, including with Project Ability Gallery, Glasgow, collaborating with artist Alastair MacLennan over the last five years as part of the Engagement Project at KCAT.

You can find out more about Declan’s work at KCAT Arts Centre here.

Elaine Byrne

Image: Elaine Byrne, 'If we winter this one out', 2020, photographic print, 148 x 87 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Elaine Byrne, 'If we winter this one out', 2020, photographic print, 148 x 87 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Elaine Byrne is a Dublin-based artist who works multimodally. Her research-based practice examines overlooked histories, historical texts and artworks as a platform to mobilize history as it relates to current political and social concerns. Employing sculpture, video and photography, Byrne focuses on opening new questions for the viewer to highlight present-day urgencies.

'If we winter this one out' is a photograph with text burnt through the image. I use customized branding irons to burn the text on the photograph so even though the image is an edition of three, each edition is unique as the exact conditions of burning the letters on the paper can never be replicated. With ski resorts partly blamed for the speed of the spread of Covid-19, the photograph was taken just before the exodus off the mountain, while the use of typography creates an extra, layered meaning to the Seamus Heaney quote, [one]  which we have become all too familiar with since the outbreak of Covid-19.’

‘I am delighted to be part of the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery as I exhibited at the gallery in 2016 and really appreciate the Crawford’s mix of historical and contemporary programming.’

Photo: Elaine Byrne. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Elaine Byrne. Courtesy of the Artist. Photograph by Aengus McMaho

Tom Climent

Image: Tom Climent, Eden, 2020, oil, plaster & sand on canvas, 244 x 183 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Tom Climent, Eden, 2020, oil, plaster & sand on canvas, 244 x 183 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Based in Cork City, Tom Climent is a painter. His work over the last twenty-five years or so has varied from paintings of figurative, urban and landscape subjects. Referencing landscape, various types of structures and natural phenomena, Climent’s Eden now joins the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery.

“The way I work is largely intuitive, painting for me starts a process of discovering unintended connections and relationships, of trying to search for reason and meaning in each work that emerges. The first marks and structures create the environment for a process that requires me to constantly re-evaluate what’s important so I can find out what the painting will be. I feel as if I’m in a relationship with the painting, it guides me as much as I control it.

Eden is very much part of the series of paintings I have been working on over the last ten years or so. I feel it is an important piece within this group of paintings. Over my time as an artist, the work I had done has been structured into groups or series of paintings. This current series is very much geometric in nature and has an overall landscape structure to it.

My work generally tends to be suggestive. I feel it absorbs places I’ve been to, experiences I’ve had and ideas and images I come across. My process of painting embraces both logic and reason and also chance and accident. I allow myself to be guided by each individual piece. The work itself exists on the borderline between abstraction and representation but also between real and spirit worlds. It allows for magic to have a role its creation.”

Photo: Tom Climent. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Tom Climent. Courtesy of the Artist.

Yvonne Condon

Yvonne Condon, acrylic on cardboard. 40cm x 50cm Euro 220
Yvonne Condon, untitled, acrylic on board, 40 x 50 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Yvonne Condon is a dynamic artist from East Cork, who is non-verbal and partially sighted. She creates bold, uncompromising images, working at great speed. 

Yvonne’s drawing style is determinedly graphic. She paints with acrylic on inexpensive card, using thick black outlines, mixing colour directly on the surface rather than a palette. Her method of production is singular, fearless and intense; she may produce a painting in a matter of just 10 minutes. Yvonne works from observation, working with sitters or collected imagery from books, magazines and photographs.

Yvonne Condon, Untitled, acrylic on board, 40 x 50 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Yvonne Condon, Untitled, acrylic on board, 40 x 50 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Yvonne participates in Crawford Supported Studio and is a long-term member of Glasheen Artists Studio Programme (GASP). Most recently Yvonne had a solo exhibition at Gallery of Atypical, Belfast, and her work was selected for exhibition at Flat Iron Gallery, New York. She has previously exhibited at Millennium Hall and the Irish Examiner Office, Cork, Paul Bardwell Gallery of Contemporary Art, Medellín, Colombia, at the Royal Hibernian Academy 185th and 186th Annual Exhibition, Crawford Art Gallery, Sirius Arts Centre, Cobh, Wandesford Quay Gallery, Copper House Gallery, Dublin.

Yvonne was a recipient of an Arts & Disability Ireland New Work Award in 2019, although progress was delayed by Covid-19 restrictions. She is currently developing public artwork with the support of Cork City Council and Princes Street Traders. Yvonne was recently interviewed by Arts & Disability Ireland as part of a ‘meet the artist’ programme. Read the piece here.

Photo: Yvonne Condon. Courtesy of Crawford Supported Studio.
Photo: Yvonne Condon. Courtesy of Crawford Supported Studio

Watch Yvonne at work in the studio:

Video courtesy of Crawford Supported Studio.

Elizabeth Cope

Elizabeth Cope, Generaton Gap (Menopausal series), oil on canvas, 183 x 244 cm. Courtesy of the Artist
Image: Elizabeth Cope, Generation Gap (Menopausal series), 2005-06, oil on canvas, 183 x 244 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Elizabeth Cope has been a painter for fifty years, known for the brilliance of colour that she applies to her canvases. She lives and works in Co. Kilkenny.

“It is the greatest honour for me to be chosen by the Crawford Art Gallery and to be a part of the National Collection.

I have had the impulse to paint since childhood. My inspiration comes from nature and from everyday life. I paint fast, on the hoof, en plein air, and I have a love of colour. But I also paint in the studio, where this work was done.”

About her work ‘Generation Gap’ which is now a part of the National Collection:

“I started this painting when in City and Guilds, London in 2005. The figure in pink reading and writing, absorbed in her own world, is our daughter, Sybil, totally indifferent to the background of lobsters. The skeletons seem to be more aware than she is: they are alive, like us, two spectators, all seeing and totally aware (I had just bought Sybil a new pair of floral boots in Oxford Street).

I finished the painting the following year in my studio at home, adding two cut-out naked figures, actively engaged somewhere between the operating theatre and the bedroom.”

Sandra Gibson was the first critic to take note of Cope’s menopausal paintings when they were exhibited in a group show, in Liverpool in 2008. She writes about it (and many others) in the essay ‘Living in a Gallery’ in Cope’s monograph, Seduced by the smell of paint, which was published in 2017 by Gandon Editions.

Photo: Elizabeth Cope. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Elizabeth Cope. Courtesy of the Artist.

Gary Coyle

Gary Coyle, At the Museum, 2020, photograph, 76 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Gary Coyle, At the Museum, 2020, photograph, 76 x 30 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Gary Coyle RHA studied at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin and the Royal College of Art, London. Coyle works in a range of media, including drawing, spoken word and performance and photography.

His work has been exhibited at venues including the Tate London, the Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris and Akkuh, Henglo. He was elected as a member of the Royal Hibernian Academy in 2007 and Aosdána in 2009. In 2018, My Magnetic North, a one-man spoken word show written and performed by Coyle, premiered at The Project Arts Centre, Dublin. In March 2020, his most recent exhibition, Dreaming Different Dreams, was held in the Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin.

Stephen Doyle

Image: Stephen Doyle, Meditating Tongqui, 2020, oil on mixed media and canvas. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Stephen Doyle, Meditating Tongqui, 2020, oil on mixed media and canvas. Courtesy of the Artist.

“As someone who is part of the LGBTQIA+ community it is a great honour to know that this piece will go towards documenting our existence and experiences.”

Stephen Doyle is a Cork-based artist and graduate of Crawford College of Art and Design (2017). Doyle’s work references queer identity and queer culture through painting and installation. Doyle was a shortlisted Artist for the Zurich Portrait Prize 2018.

‘Meditating Tongqui’ has now been added to the National Collection, joining Doyle’s Dylan is ainm dom…(2018), for which he was shortlisted for the Zurich Portrait Prize and which was acquired by Crawford Art Gallery in early 2020.

Here, Doyle discusses the genesis of ‘Meditating Tongqui’:

“This piece highlights the millions of ‘Tongqui/Tongfu’, currently living in China. The coined name refers to homosexuals married to opposite sex partners because of an obligation to lineage or simply to avoid suspicion of being homosexual or for any number of personal or political reasons. It questions identity, both cultural and sexual. It renders the sitter submerged in an environment void of connection.

There is a sense of confusion, yet comfortability within this space suggested by the sitter's body language, further validated by the removal of their shoes, indicating they have existed in this space for a considerable amount of time. The vibrant spray-painted information post is ironically stripped of instruction: a commentary on the government's acknowledgement of the issue and their lack of action to aid their queer citizens. This piece highlights those who don't get to live the lives they would rather. Some of us will grow old and ponder what could have been.”

Photo: Stephen Doyle, courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Stephen Doyle, courtesy of the Artist.

Rita Duffy

Image: Rita Duffy, 'The Emperor has no Clothes' (4 from series of 10), 2020, graphite on paper, 29.7 x 21 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Rita Duffy, 'The Emperor has no Clothes' (4 from series of 10), 2020, graphite on paper, 29.7 x 21 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

“Art is a spiritual force and after this, the most difficult of years, I am reassured and encouraged by this support. Right now, I feel relieved and very happy to have the financial capability of making practical plans that will keep me inspired and working.”

Belfast-born Rita Duffy gained a BA from the Art & Design Centre and an MA in Fine Art from the University of Ulster. Duffy continues to initiate major collaborative art projects and was made an Honorary Member of Royal Society of Architects for her developmental work in the built environment. In 2004, ‘Thaw’, a contemporary art project with environmental concerns aimed to bring an iceberg to Belfast: history and narrative continue to pulse through her work. In 2018, she was recognised for her contribution to visual arts in Ireland and elected to the Aosdána, Ireland’s elected ‘people of the arts’.

Currently Duffy holds a Visiting Artist Fellowship at Trinity College, Dublin.

Photo: Rita Duffy. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Rita Duffy. Courtesy of the Artist.

Three works by Duffy have joined the National Collection here at Crawford Art Gallery: ‘Troubled Ship’ (2009), ‘Guantanamo, Amas, Amat’ (2017) and ‘The Emperor’s New Clothes’ (2020).

Troubled ship 4
‘Troubled Ship’ (2009)

According to Duffy, ‘Troubled Ship’ is “a long drawing that depicts street scenes of the conflict in the North, meticulous, detailed and carefully situated within the nautical architecture of the great ship Titanic. I selected and purchased this ‘Iron Deck’ plan from Harland and Wolf and populated the grid with images from my note books and archive. In this rendition of the Titanic story, the Iceberg is carried deep in the heart of the vessel.”

Image: Rita Duffy, Guantanamo, Amas, Amat, 2017, oil on linen, 182 x 121 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Rita Duffy, Guantanamo, Amas, Amat, 2017, oil on linen, 182 x 121 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

“‘Guantanamo, Amas, Amat’ depicts the orange jumpsuit I used to wear in the studio: my perception of the garment changed after watching televison images of hooded prisoners in Guantanamo Bay. The title was a result of a conversation with poet Paul Muldoon and reminds us that human rights violations threaten us all.”

‘The Emperor’s New Clothes’ (see above) is a series of ten drawings made in response to television coverage of the Trump presidency in the USA. “I return regularly to Goya's War etchings, Hieronymus Bosch and Breughel, their compositions pull me into the detailed depictions of humanity. I watch Trumps daily briefings in disbelief – a reoccurring horror show in which all the neuroses that haunt American subconscious dance naked on live TV.”

Amanda Dunsmore

Image: Amanda Dunsmore, ‘David’ - Senator David Norris, 2012, silent filmed video portrait, 16:9 video, 19:19 minutes, looped in exhibition presentation. Edition 2 of 3+AP.
Image: Amanda Dunsmore, ‘David’ - Senator David Norris, 2012, silent filmed video portrait, 16:9 video, 19:19 minutes, looped in exhibition presentation. Edition 2 of 3+AP.

Amanda Dunsmore is a visual artist whose art practice employs art processes that explores representations of societal transformation through portraiture. She works with video, sound, photography and installation.

Dunsmore’s filmed portraits feature social actors who have transformed society, often filming them in locations of social-historic significance. Her portraits evolve through long periods of research and the work is presented as a series of extensive socio-political/historical art projects. Central to Dunsmore’s art practice is an exploration of potential future memory in society, the accumulative legacy of portraiture in archiving history and the long-term value of socio-political art making.

The Irish LGBTQ+ activist Senator David Norris’ portrait ‘David’ (2012), was filmed as part of an older LGBTQ+ generation, year-long art project and produced for an art commission for Galway County and City Council – which also led to the art project Becoming Christine.

Senator Norris is a leading campaigner for gay rights, a humanist, a conservationist and academic. He is a renowned Joycean scholar and known as an animated and brilliant raconteur. Filmed in the attic of the James Joyce Centre, Dublin, the portrait is 20 minutes in length and silent. In this artwork Senator Norris sits composed, surrounded by books and the remnants of Joyce-related activities.

Speaking at the launch of #YourNationalCollection, Dunsmore said:

“I'm so very proud to be involved with the Crawford Art Gallery and this National Collection. It's very important to purchase artworks that have already been made. The artwork ‘David’ is of an individual who imparted a significant shift upon society for the better and my film portraits are reflective of these individuals.”

Photo: Amanda Dunsmore artist talk at the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin 2018 in front of her work ‘The People’s Portraits 1899 – 1918’ (2018). Courtesy of the Hugh Lane Gallery.
Photo: Amanda Dunsmore artist talk at the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin 2018 in front of her work ‘The People’s Portraits 1899 – 1918’ (2018). Courtesy of the Hugh Lane Gallery.
Image: Amanda Dunsmore, still from ‘Senator David Norris’, 2012, silent filmed portrait, 20 mins, installed at Crawford Art Gallery in 2014.
Image: Amanda Dunsmore, installation view ‘David’ (2012), at Crawford Art Gallery in 2014.

Watch Amanda Dunsmore speak about being part of #YourNationalCollection at Crawford Art Gallery at its official online launch in April 2021:

Kevin Gaffney

Image: Kevin Gaffney, still from ‘Expulsion’, 2012, single channel video, 30 mins. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Kevin Gaffney, still from ‘Expulsion’, 2012, single channel video, 30 mins. Courtesy of the Artist.

Kevin Gaffney is an artist-filmmaker from Dublin.

Crawford Art Gallery audiences may be familiar with his work from his solo exhibition which was held at the gallery from 11 September 2020 to 31 January 2021, entitled ‘Expulsion’, whose namesake film is now part of the National Collection with us.

Partially shot on location in the gallery, the film ‘Expulsion’ imagines a Queer State, an anti-capitalist society whose citizens strive to live in harmony with the environment:

“Having the Crawford as a location to shoot the film in really influenced the script as it developed, and I imagined the Queer State’s ‘seat of power’ being located in the Crawford.

Filming in the Sculpture Galleries and the Library were highlights for myself and the cast and I’m delighted that this new work is part of the National Collection so soon after it was made. After working for so long on it, I’m excited that it will continue to reach new audiences.”

Photo: Kevin Gaffney on set. Courtesy of the Artist
Photo: Kevin Gaffney on set. Courtesy of the Artist

Gaffney graduated from the Royal College of Art in London in 2011 with an MA Photography and Moving Image, and was awarded the first Sky Academy Arts Scholarship for an Irish artist in 2015. His work is part of the Irish Museum of Modern Art’s collection and a monograph of his work, Unseen By My Open Eyes, was published in 2017. ‘Expulsion’ was created as the practical component of Kevin’s PhD research project, ‘Resisting Homonormativity in Queer Filmmaking Practice’, in the cinematic arts department at Ulster University.

Visit our exhibition archive for further information on Gaffney’s work, including text, audio and video materials created to support ‘Expulsion’ during its exhibition run in 2020 and early 2021.

Image: Kevin Gaffney, still from ‘Expulsion’, 2012, single channel video, 30 mins. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Kevin Gaffney, still from ‘Expulsion’, 2012, single channel video, 30 mins. Courtesy of the Artist.

Debbie Godsell

Photo: Debbie Godsell. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Debbie Godsell. Courtesy of the Artist.

My main goal was to create a work that wasn’t going to use any new materials. As an artist, I was conscious of our overuse of materials and I was really aware that we’re putting stuff out in the world that we don't always need to.

‘Stack’ by Cork-based printmaker Debbie Godsell reflects the complex transitioning from traditional rural Ireland to a country that belongs in a contemporary global world. Repurposed artist prints are fashioned in the iconic style of Bord na Móna peat briquettes. The stack is balanced precariously on a school chair. Ancient turbary rights and traditions, plus a highly charged post-colonial relationship with the land, sit uncomfortably in the face of environmental concerns and the search for ecological solutions.

“I like the fact that you can’t see the prints but there is quite a lot of imagery compressed into each briquette. That’s really like the bog itself, because it takes a thousand years to grow a metre of turf. When you think of all that history and memory and the stories that are going on beneath our feet.”

Debbie Godsell graduated with a Masters in Fine Art Research in 2002 from Crawford College of Art and Design. Since then Debbie has been working full-time as an artist and art educator, specialising in printmaking. Her work is widely collected in Ireland and has been acquired by the Office of Public Works, the National Gallery of Ireland, Crawford Art Gallery, University College Cork, University College Dublin, Cork Opera House and the Port of Cork, to name a few. She was a recipient of the Cork County Arts Office Ballinglen Arts Foundation Residency 2019 and the Tyrone Guthrie Bursary Award 2017. Debbie curated and exhibited in ‘Visions of half light’, Macroom Town Hall Gallery, funded by Cork County Arts Office in July 2018. Recent exhibitions include 'Time and the other', Doswell Gallery (2019) ‘Site’, Doswell Gallery (2018), ‘The infinite Whatever’ at the Garter Lane Arts Centre and Cork Printmakers Gallery (2017). She has previously been a recipient of an Arts Council travel award and a Cork City Council Visual Arts bursary. Debbie is a member of Cork Printmakers and Visual Arts Ireland. Debbie was a shortlisted Artist for the Zurich Portrait Prize 2018 at the National Gallery of Ireland. 

Image: Debbie Godsell, 'Stack', 2019-21, repurposed original screen prints and etchings on wooden chair, 95 x 38 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Debbie Godsell, 'Stack', 2019-21, repurposed original screen prints and etchings on wooden chair, 95 x 38 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

Watch Debbie Godsell talk about her work joining the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery in this video filmed at her studio:

Michael Hanna

Image: Michael Hanna, 'A Living Colour Index' (1 of 49), 2020, photographic print. Courtesy of the Artist and MAC, Belfast.
Image: Michael Hanna, 'A Living Colour Index' (1 of 49), 2020, photographic print. Courtesy of the Artist and MAC, Belfast.

“It is very exciting and a real honour to have this work be part of the National Collection.”

Michael Hanna is an artist based in Belfast who uses affective experience to explore areas of connection between psychology, physicality and society. His work seeks to generate new experiences within familiar states by unsettling the semantic relationships between the verbal and the visual, the perceptual and the conceptual, and invoking an awareness of processes that operate below the level of consciousness. He works in a wide range of forms including text-based sculpture, video and immersive environments with site-specific and responsive installation.

“In April last year, the MAC in Belfast commissioned me to make a piece of work to be shown online. I was keen to do something durational that responded to the feeling I was having of losing track of days during that initial period of lockdown.”

Over the course of seven weeks during the first lockdown in 2020, the interior of artist Michael Hanna’s home was lit entirely with a different colour each week, moving through the colour spectrum from red to violet, with each week providing a new sensory living environment within the same space.

“Over the next few months, I developed the work 'A Living Colour Index', based around how novel experiences play a part in memory foundation and set the parameters for our experience of time.”

‘A Living Colour Index’ became a 49-day online project by Hanna with the MAC Belfast, with an interior image or video posted on Instagram accompanied by a quotation related to memory, colour, space, perception and time using the cultural hub’s Instagram account.

Photo: Michael Hanna in his studio. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Michael Hanna in his studio. Courtesy of the Artist.

Marie Holohan

Image: Marie Holohan, Áras an Uachtaráin, 2019, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.
Image: Marie Holohan, Áras an Uachtaráin, 2019, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.

Marie Holohan is painter and a founding member of the Arts Ability Studio Group at CUMAS, New Ross, Co. Wexford.

Marie’s work features surreal patterns and vibrant colours to create vivid, detailed paintings which build highly imaginative and dreamlike landscapes. The starting point for these paintings is usually a photographic image, but this is quickly discarded and her natural creativity leads her to depict vivid landscapes and strange new realities.

Using acrylic on canvas, Marie’s primary concern is colour which she applies in controlled, linear patterns that lead the eye through the painting, tracing the dimensions of her created worlds. Marie fearlessly directs these colours, and although her application is controlled and precise, the work remains incredibly free and unforced, which serves to highlight her paint handling skills.

Here at Crawford Art Gallery, four works of Marie’s join the National Collection, each depicting a place of significance: Áras an Uachtaráin, the official residence of the President of Ireland; The Tyrone Guthrie Centre, Annaghmakerrig, a residential workplace and residency programme in Co.Monaghan for artists; Kilkenny Castle, originally built soon after the Norman conquest of Ireland in the twelfth century and now open to visitors; and Johnstown Castle, a twelth-century castle rebuilt in the Gothic Revival style in the nineteenth century.

Photo: Marie Holohan at work in her studio. Courtesy of the Artist
Photo: Marie Holohan at work in her studio. Courtesy of the Artist

Marie has exhibited locally, nationally and internationally significant exhibition are ‘One woman‘, a solo show at the Wexford Arts Centre in 2016. ‘Beyond’ a national exhibition curated by Brent Pope and Perceptions 2016 here at Crawford Gallery.  She has work in private and public collection such as Loftis Hall and the Wexford County Council Art Collection. She currently has work on show in the Wexford Community Development offices in New Ross and was selected to be part of Pathway 6 Grangegorman Public Art in the new Primary Care Centre Grangegorman, Dublin.

Image: Marie Holohan, ‘Kilkenny Castle’, 2019, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.
Image: Marie Holohan, ‘Kilkenny Castle’, 2019, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.
Image. Marie Holohan, ‘The Tyrone Guthrie Centre, Annaghmakerrig’, 2019, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.
Image. Marie Holohan, ‘The Tyrone Guthrie Centre, Annaghmakerrig’, 2019, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.
Image: Marie Holohan, ‘Johnstown Castle’, 2018, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.
Image: Marie Holohan, ‘Johnstown Castle’, 2018, acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the Artist and CUMAS Arts Ability Studio Group.

Katie Holten

Image:  Katie Holten, Irish Tree Alphabet, 2020, vinyl wall drawing. Installation view, VISUAL Carlow. Photo by Ros Kavanagh. Courtesy the artist and VISUAL Carlow.
Image: Katie Holten, Irish Tree Alphabet, 2020, vinyl wall drawing. Installation view, VISUAL Carlow. Photo by Ros Kavanagh. Courtesy the artist and VISUAL Carlow. Photo Ros Kavanagh

Katie Holten combines ancient Ogham script with the writing conventions of Irish and English in her ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’, now included in the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery.

The ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’ was commissioned by VISUAL Carlow for Holten’s solo exhibition there last year, in Holten’s words, “the year that we lost to Covid-19”.

The ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’ had been fifteen years in the making, in many ways representing the culmination of work that Holten started in 2004 with with the support of a Fulbright scholarship in New York City, where the artist began researching our relationship with Nature in the City. The artist has made drawings of trees, existing natives as well as non-native trees that now call Ireland home due to the changing climate. Each tree replaces a letter in the Latin alphabet; A = Ailm (Scots Pine), B = Beith (Birch), C = Coll (Hazel), etc. The result is a new Irish Tree Alphabet and a typeface called Irish Trees.

“We are in a Climate Emergency,” says Holten. “I hope that this work, the ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’, can help share a positive message, create a sense of urgency, and invite people to come together to take action. It’s also fun! It’s a drawing, a living work. I hope that one day we can plant people’s messages with trees: Reforest Ireland? Maybe, I hope!”

Deeply committed to social issues, especially as they pertain to environmental concerns, Holten makes drawings, sculptures, installations, books, public artworks and ephemeral actions. She often works on site to explore the history, ecology, and other invisible aspects of an environment. At the root of her practice is a fascination with the contingency of organic and man-made systems and the inextricable relationship between humans and the natural world.

“I feel it’s my duty as an artist, as a human being, to create work that speaks to this moment. We’re living in the Anthropocene, a new geological era that we Humans have created. We have affected every biological system on the planet and I feel compelled to make work that speaks to the urgency of the times that we’re living in. I feel it’s my duty to create work, like the Irish Tree Alphabet, that speaks to our relationship with the planet and other species.”

Download the ‘Irish Trees’ typeface for free here:

Read and listen to Holten speaking about the ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’ here.

Holten’s solo museum exhibitions include VISUAL, Ireland (2020); the New Orleans Museum of Art (2012); Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, (2010); The Bronx Museum, New York (2009); Nevada Museum of Art, Reno (2008) and Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (2007). In 2003, Holten represented Ireland at the 50th Venice Biennale. In 2004 she went to NYC as a Fulbright Scholar with Cornell University to research our relationship with ‘Nature’ in Cities.

Photo: Katie Holten. Courtesy of the Artist and Dillon Cohen.
Photo: Katie Holten. Courtesy of the Artist and Dillon Cohen.
Image: Katie Holten, Irish Tree Alphabet, 2020, vinyl wall drawing. Installation view, VISUAL Carlow. Photo by Ros Kavanagh. Courtesy of the Artist and VISUAL Carlow.
Image: Katie Holten, Irish Tree Alphabet, 2020, vinyl wall drawing. Installation view, VISUAL Carlow. Photo by Ros Kavanagh. Courtesy of the Artist and VISUAL Carlow.

Brianna Hurley

Image: Brianna Hurley, 'The tornado alley's worst nightmare', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 50x50cm. Courtesy of the Artist and KCAT Studios.
Image: Brianna Hurley, 'The tornado alley's worst nightmare', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 50x50cm. Courtesy of the Artist and KCAT Studios.

Brianna Hurley is an Irish artist, originally from Bucharest, Romania and now based in Co. Kilkenny.

Brianna initially participated in a number of courses at KCAT, a multi-disciplinary arts and educational centre in Callan, Co. Kilkenny. After her initial training, she became a full-time member of KCAT’s professional artist studio, where she continues to develop her love of painting and drawing.

Image: Brianna Hurley, ‘Beautiful landscape of Castalia’, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 50x50cm. Courtesy of the Artist and KCAT Studios.
Image: Brianna Hurley, ‘Beautiful landscape of Castalia’, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 50x50cm. Courtesy of the Artist and KCAT Studios.

Brianna takes inspiration from her travels in Spain, architecture, and her love of playing basketball. In recent times, Brianna has been creating a world of her own through her painting practice, for example, by developing the planet of Castalia (named after Castalia Hall in Ballytobin, Co. Kilkenny), painting by painting. The imagined and dramatic landscape of this world features in many recent painting. Further motifs in her paintings include cityscapes, basketball matches and tornados.

Photo: Brianna Hurley. Courtesy of the Artist/KCAT Studio.
Photo: Brianna Hurley. Courtesy of the Artist/KCAT Studio.

Andrew Kearney

Andrew Kearney, 'Farther to the East', 2004-19. Courtesy of the Artist, photo: Jed Niezgoda.
Andrew Kearney, 'Farther to the East', 2004-19. Courtesy of the Artist, photo: Jed Niezgoda.

Andrew Kearney is a visual artist from Limerick. In 2019, he held a solo exhibition at the gallery, ‘Mechanism’, which comprised of electronic, industrial and theatrical elements which responded, listened and reacted to the everyday life of Crawford Art Gallery and its city centre surroundings.

His work ‘Farther to the East’ was included in this exhibition and has now joined the National Collection with us. Here’s what Kearney had to say about how the work came into being:

“[‘Farther to the East’] had its origins in a road journey from Berlin to Auschwitz-Birkenau during the summer of 2002. As I travelled eastwards, maps were followed and objects and places photographed, each eventually becoming an entry in a filmic diary. Two years later while resident at the Banff Centre for the Arts, Alberta, Canada, I returned to the diary.

“Gradually, the found objects of that earlier journey led to an assortment of flat, plaster-cast rings, sediment like, placed in varying combinations, one on top of the other, forming a series of moulds. Each mould was then filled with black, stoneware slip forming a fragile-skin before being fired, a family of urns emerged. When placed in line the urns supported and augmented each other, their insistent repetition evoking long-silenced voices.”

“In the stillness of the gallery, the dense materiality of Farther to the East asserts something incontrovertible, beyond speech. Perched high above and bathed in a notional pool of ever-changing fluorescent pink light, the work inverts the usual role of the audience below. The empty pool exudes a particular potency, an almost threatening aura of pleasure abandoned, denied, forbidden. The viewer is remote, struggling, submerged. The ready-made ladder – just beyond reach – a truncated signifier of an unattainable sensuality.”

“If the sun-drenched pools of popular culture – from Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard to Hockney’s The Bigger Splash - conjure a life of hedonism, they might also suggest a more transgressive resistant current, a critique of normative values. As with much of my art, the empty pool forces a reconsideration of an environment as it changes, taking us from an unknowable future back into a scarring past.”

Photo: Andrew Kearney, 2021. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Andrew Kearney, 2021. Courtesy of the Artist.

Andrew Kearney is based in Limerick and London. Recent exhibitions include Mechanism, Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris and The Dock, Carrick On Shannon (2017); On Arriving, Watts Artist Village and Gallery, Surrey (2016); Tell Me Something Limerick City of Culture (2014) and SKYLUM, Justice Lipsius Council, Brussels and Nuit Blanche, Toronto (2012/13) and Embrace the Place, TATE Britain (2011).

John Keating

Image: John Keating, 'Shopping Trolley' , ink on paper, 30cm x 23cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Crawford Supported Studio.
Image: John Keating, 'Shopping Trolley' , ink on paper, 30cm x 23cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Crawford Supported Studio.

John Keating is a Cork-based artist who works to create pieces using dry point etching, ink, water colour paints, charcoal, coffee and  juice. Three ink-on-paper works by John are now part of the National Collection: ‘Girl on Dog’, ‘Girl in Shopping Trolley’ and ‘Shopping Trolley’.

These works demonstrate John’s keen technical skill and wry sense of humour, deftly transforming his ‘everyday’ subjects – the all-too-familiar shopping trolley, an encounter with a friendly dog – with his commitment to the quality of his drawn line.

Image: John Keating, 'Girl in Shopping Trolley' , ink on paper, 30cm x 23cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Crawford Supported Studio.
Image: John Keating, 'Girl in Shopping Trolley' , ink on paper, 30cm x 23cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Crawford Supported Studio.

John is a member of Crawford Supported Studio. Through a recent Arts and Disability Connect Award, John has been developing new processes along with fellow Supported Studio members Íde Ni Shúilleabháin and Ailbhe Barrett in collaboration with Cork Printmakers.

Image: John Keating, 'Girl on Dog’ , ink on paper, 30cm x 23cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Crawford Supported Studio.
Image: John Keating, 'Girl on Dog’ , ink on paper, 30cm x 23cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Crawford Supported Studio.

John’s previous projects and exhibitions have included showing work at Paul Barwell Gallery of Contemporary Art, Medellín, Colombia, Crawford Art Gallery, Cork City Hall, Cork Public Museum in Fitzgerald’s Park, Cork Coffee Roasters, Millennium Hall, Cork, Quay Co-op, Cork, MTU Crawford College of Art and Design, Sirius Arts Centre, Cobh, The Vision Centre, Cork, and The Irish Examiner (Newspaper) office, Cork.

Photo: John Keating at work on a print. Courtesy of Crawford Supported Studio.
Photo: John Keating at work on a print. Courtesy of Crawford Supported Studio.

Fiona Kelly

Photo: Fiona Kelly. Courtesy of the Artist. Credit: John Beasley
Photo: Fiona Kelly. Courtesy of the Artist. Credit: John Beasley

Fiona Kelly, a visual artist and Westmeath native, is based in Cork.

Kelly makes sculptural objects and printed matter from a foraged, ever-expanding archive of waste.

“This archive holds a compendium of debris which I alter and arrange to narrate the rapid unmaking of land by humanistic interruptions.”

Homing’ (2019) consists of three wooden pieces, each taking the archetypal form of a house, onto which Kelly screen-printed depictions of landscapes – wild grasses, debris and the ocean – with bitumen, a material commonly used in construction. As Kelly says, ‘to be home is to be on familiar ground, or homing, to return by instinct to its territory after an absence’.

Kelly has had a long-running connection to Crawford Art Gallery:

“When I first arrived in Cork City, the Crawford Art Gallery immediately became a haven to me, it’s a space in which one can really disappear within, to another mindset, another realm, a public space which seems oddly private. My first visit was to The Sleep of Reason exhibit (2007) an amazing show that I remember so fondly. I set myself an objective to exhibit within these walls. Now my work has gone a step further: it shall live within these walls. I’m delighted and feel truly honoured to be part of the National Connection.”

Image: Fiona Kelly, ‘Homing’, 2019, bitumen on savaged shipping crate. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Fiona Kelly, ‘Homing’, 2019, bitumen on savaged shipping crate. Courtesy of the Artist.

Kelly is an artist member of Cork Printmakers’ studio. Her work has been widely exhibited, with some of her most recent shows including Land of Some Other Order, Lavit Gallery; Overburden, Triskel Arts Centre; The Mouth of a Shark, Edinburgh Printmakers Gallery, UK; Field Study, The Auxiliary, UK; The Dirt that Measures All Our Time, Mermaid Arts Centre. 

Anne Kiely & Mary Palmer

Photo: Anne Kiely (L) & Mary Palmer (R) at the opening of Earth, Wind & Fire: Made in Cork Contemporary at Crawford Art Gallery in 2019. Credit: Provision.
Photo: Anne Kiely (L) & Mary Palmer (R) at the opening of Earth, Wind & Fire: Made in Cork Contemporary at Crawford Art Gallery in 2019. Credit: Provision.

Made specifically for the Crawford Art Gallery exhibition Earth, Wind & Fire (2019), ‘Who Will Tell the Bees?’ – now a part of the National Collection – can be seen as a continuation of the history of textiles within the Cork School of Art context. The artists have a significant local, national and international profile and have worked together, as well as their individual practices, for nearly 15 years. The work addresses environmental concerns, ecology and landscape within wider themes of the histories of women’s traditional and contemporary work.

Anne Kiely is a textile artist based in Cork, Ireland. She creates pieces for exhibitions and works as an artist facilitator for community and education projects. Anne trained and worked in fashion which led her to screen-printing bespoke fabrics: Anne digitally combines her hand screen printed images, etchings, and manipulated photographic images to produce layered designs that echo characteristics of the handmade. Products include fabrics, wallpaper and light shades.

Mary Palmer formed Marimu Designs in 2006 as a spin-off from a successful textile arts supply business. Mary has been involved in the quilting scene in Cork for over 25 years and has exhibited traditional and modern works both at home and abroad She has served on numerous committees and held offices within the Irish Patchwork Society, and is a founder of the cross border initiative, Quilters Guild of Ireland, as well as the contemporary textile art group Cork Textiles Network. In 2009, Mary was certified as a quilt judge through the Quilters Guild of the British Isles. Mary currently serves on the boards of The Design and Crafts Council of Ireland and Cork Craft and Design.

Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees', 2019, art quilt. Courtesy of the Artists.
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees', 2019, art quilt. Courtesy of the Artists.
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees?' (detail).
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees?' (detail).
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees?' (detail).
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees?' (detail).
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees?' (detail).
Image: Anne Kiely and Mary Palmer, 'Who Will Tell The Bees?' (detail).

Roseanne Lynch

Photo: Roseanne Lynch. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Roseanne Lynch. Courtesy of the Artist.

“To be recognized and supported by this purchase means future projects are more

likely to get support. The boost to moral at this time of uncertainty is invaluable.”

Roseanne Lynch is a Cork-based visual artist with an international photography practice looking at modernist architecture and the medium of photography itself. A number of her works have now joined the National Collection here at Crawford Art Gallery.

A residency at The Bauhaus Foundation, Dessau in 2018, prompted Lynch to move to Leipzig temporarily to make this work. Over 18 months her concentration turned from the buildings and Building Materials Archive to the teachings of the Johannes Itten preliminary course undertaken by students at the Bauhaus school of design, architecture and applied arts. She brought her darkroom-based practice to these principles of experimentation and learning the grammar of your materials.

The work was made with the support of the Arts Council of Ireland, Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris and The Bauhaus Foundation, Dessau.

Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Building Research Archive, Broken glass globe /68], silver gelatin fibre based paper by artist. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Building Research Archive, Broken glass globe /68], silver gelatin fibre based paper by artist. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Building Research Archive, The Kandinsky's Bath/62], silver gelatin fibre based paper by artist. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Building Research Archive, The Kandinsky's Bath/62], silver gelatin fibre based paper by artist. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Building Research Archive, 96/6], silver gelatin fibre based paper by artist. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Building Research Archive, 96/6], silver gelatin fibre based paper by artist. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Interior 86]. Courtesy of the Artist.
Image: Roseanne Lynch, Untitled [Bauhaus Interior 86]. Courtesy of the Artist.

Brian Maguire

Photo: Brian Maguire. Courtesy of the Artist/Galerie Christophe Gaillard.
Photo: Brian Maguire. Courtesy of the Artist/Galerie Christophe Gaillard.

‘Arizona Border 3’by Brian Maguire joins the National Collection at Crawford Gallery ahead of the artist’s solo exhibition here, ARIZONA, which is scheduled to run from 17 September 2021 to 9 January 2022.

Earlier this year, Maguire put these words together on the work:

“The painting Arizona 3 that has been acquired by the Crawford Art Gallery is one of a yet untitled series which deal with the loss of life by Central American migrants crossing the Sonora Desert, which is split between Mexico and the USA.  In 2019, I visited Tucson, Arizona with the film maker Mark McLoughlin to attend a meeting with the Chief Medical Officer of Puma County. The Doctor, Gregory Hess, welcomed our interest and for educational purposes gave us access to the files of the deceased migrants, of whom his office held thousands. In recent years hundreds of men die annually making this perilous journey across the desert. while seeking work in the USA.  

I returned in November of that year to view the case files and selected over 90 cases from which I made a series of paintings. The Crawford Art Gallery will host the first showing of these works in September 2021. The people in the images are in different states of decay, some skeletal, there is anonymity as true identity is seldom carried.  The purpose of the work is simple – to draw attention to what is happening.  That one of these works is collected by an Irish Museum is very appropriate as in the 1840s our people died at sea attempting a similar migration. In the Reagan years, Central American states were destabilised and the destruction of democracy has given over to the hegemony of criminal cartels from which the people flee poverty and violence, just like the Irish those years ago.”

Maguire has shown extensively in Europe and the US, most recently at the Museo De Arte de Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and the Rubin Centre, Texas University at El Paso, Texas (September 2019), at the United Nations Headquarters, New York, (in 2020), the Rhona Hoffmann Gallery, Chicago, (January 2021), and Galerie Christophe Gaillard, Paris (March 2021).

Image:  Brian Maguire, 'Arizona Border 3', 2020, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 140 x 4.5cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Kerlin Gallery, Dublin.
Image: Brian Maguire, 'Arizona Border 3', 2020, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 140 x 4.5cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Kerlin Gallery, Dublin.
Image: 2. Brian Maguire, 'Arizona Border 3’ (detail), 2020. Courtesy of the Artist and Kerlin Gallery, Dublin.
Image: 2. Brian Maguire, 'Arizona Border 3’ (detail), 2020. Courtesy of the Artist and Kerlin Gallery, Dublin.

EVGENIYA MARTIROSYAN

Photo: Evgeniya Martirosyan. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Evgeniya Martirosyan. Courtesy of the Artist.

Evgeniya Martirosyan is a Russian/Armenian artist based in Cork whose background is rooted in philosophy and design. Working primarily in the mediums of sculpture and installation, Evgeniya is interested in exploring the concepts of time, matter, chaos and transformation.

Martirosyan describes the process of making Chrysalis (2020), made of 300 individually hand-stitched bicycle valves, now a part of the National Collection at Crawford Art Gallery:

“In 2019 I started working with discarded materials, collecting rubber from hundreds of bicycle tires and inner tubes. I accumulated large quantities of valves as a by-product of this process.  Having no clear idea of what to do, I began stitching the valves together.  I often work intuitively, thinking with my hands. The idea of applying domestic gestures to this industrial material appealed to me.  As the 'fabric' grew in size, it developed intriguing organic qualities: suggestive of mutated life forms and, in hindsight, having distinct viral references.”

Martirosyan graduated from the Crawford College of Art and Design in 2016, receiving a number of awards, including residencies at Sample-Studios and The National Sculpture Factory, and exhibition awards at Cork Film Centre and TACTIC Gallery. Since graduating Evgeniya has received the 2018 VAI Residency Award at the Tyrone Guthrie Centre and individual bursary awards from Cork City Arts Council and The Arts Council of Ireland. Her most recent shows include a solo exhibition at TACTIC Gallery, Cork, titled ‘Between Something and Nothing’ and ‘Monumental Temporal’ group exhibition with PRAKSIS at Fellesverkstedet, Oslo, Norway. Evgeniya is currently engaged in the Artist-in-Studio Scheme which is associated with The National Sculpture Factory and is designed to support emerging artists.

Evgeniya Martirosyan 'Chrysalis',  2020, 300 hand-stitched bicycle valves and two wall hooks. Courtesy of the Artist. Installation view in 'Under Skin 7', The Lab, Dublin by Louis Haugh.
Evgeniya Martirosyan 'Chrysalis', 2020, 300 hand-stitched bicycle valves and two wall hooks. Courtesy of the Artist. Installation view in 'Under Skin 7', The Lab, Dublin by Louis Haugh.
Image:  Evgeniya Martirosyan 'Chrysalis' (detail), 2020. Courtesy of the Artist & Louis Haugh.
Image: Evgeniya Martirosyan 'Chrysalis' (detail), 2020. Courtesy of the Artist & Louis Haugh.

DANNY MCCARTHY

Photo: Danny McCarthy. Courtesy of the Artist.
Photo: Danny McCarthy. Courtesy of the Artist.

“‘Found Sound (Lost At Sea 11.1.11)’ arose primarily from my interest in listening and in acoustic ecology. It also arose from my interest in the disappearance of many familiar sounds from modern society. I became aware of the cessation of the sound of the foghorn off the Irish coast on the 11January 2011. This occurred during a residency I was spending at the Crawford Art Gallery with the group Strange Attractor, creating new work in front of live audiences.

After much research and discussions with curator Dawn Williams, the current site was arrived at having previously investigated other rooftop locations and several other positions. The work was contracted by the gallery for five years after the conclusion of the residency with Strange Attractor, to be sounded on 11 January each year.

Further inspiration for the work came from a residency that the artist had spent some time earlier in Roches Point Lighthouse, funded by the Arts Council, and at the Sirius Arts Centre in Cobh, where I made many field recordings of the foghorn, video works and paintings which resulted in an exhibition ‘Beyond The Point’ and a CD of the same name available from Farpoint Recordings.

The work when presented at the Crawford created great response from the public which many contacting the Gallery and me with stories of how the foghorn played a part in their lives and how the sound evoked many memories of childhood holidays, others with sad tales of lives lost at sea. It really is an iconic sound that so very many relate to and were unaware of its disappearance until told about it.

The work is site-specific to Crawford Art Gallery and is the very first sound installation to be purchased for the National Collection. It is sonically designed to work best in its Emmet Place setting whilst echoing through the surrounding streets and laneways. The work sounds intermittently and not like a clock on the hour etc. thereby incorporating the artists practice of listening with the audience listening whilst waiting for the work to sound. The silent speakers on the gallery’s parapet also invite the question as to what they are for or evokes the sound of the foghorn now silent. It also brings to mind the Crawford’s building’s original maritime connections with it once being the Custom House for the city and the fact that ships sailed up the Lee as far as the Crawford.

I am extremely proud of being in the National Collection but even more so in the fact that this unique work is with Crawford Art Gallery, who have been staunch supporters of my work over many years.”

Danny McCarthy, 'Found Sound 11.1.11', 2011, sound installation. Installation shot at Crawford Art Gallery in 2011. Courtesy of the Artist.
Danny McCarthy, 'Found Sound 11.1.11', 2011, sound installation. Installation shot at Crawford Art Gallery in 2011. Courtesy of the Artist.

Listen to Danny McCarthy speak about this work here:

Crawford Art Gallery · DannyMcCarthy1
Crawford Art Gallery · DannyMcCarthy2

 

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