DRAWING WITH REGINA CARBAYO - Tone Values

Artist Regina Carbayo joins us from Spain with a bilingual video. Watch Regina at work creating a tonal study. 
Regina says "Seeing values when drawing means identifying the different tones from light to dark. The tonal differences are called ‘values’. I use shading techniques in this video with graphite, pencil and an eraser. I have chosen to work from the sculpture An Strachaire Fir by Joseph Higgins as I find it to be very strong and full of expression. There is a lot of contrast which will help you to easily identify shadows and light”.

Download this handy explanatory PDF

Click on the video below to view the process

To see more from Regina go to:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAtXZmWnovZ9AwwzjonyNAA

Initiated by the National Gallery in 2005/ Drawing Day is a nationwide event held in partnership with national, regional and local museums, libraries, cultural and arts centres.

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Drawing with Mary Galvin

 Mary facilitates Saturday art classes in the gallery.

'My work as an artist-painter takes inspiration from the natural world.  Using a mix of my own drawings and found images I combine them forming new compositions that reflect on human interaction with nature and our attempt to control and protect it simultaneously.'

List of drawing materials:

Some tips: 

Click on the video below to view the process

Initiated by the National Gallery in 2005/ Drawing Day is a nationwide event held in partnership with national, regional and local museums, libraries, cultural and arts centres.

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Cardboard collage with Mary Timmons

Mary facilitates Saturday art classes in the gallery.

“I am a ceramic and textile artist based in Cork. I enjoy trying out new materials and experimenting with new techniques. Art is all about fun and having a go.

Collage is always a part of my work, sometimes through research and often in the final work.

It really inspires both my teaching and my own work”

Click on the video below to view the process

Initiated by the National Gallery in 2005/ Drawing Day is a nationwide event held in partnership with national, regional and local museums, libraries, cultural and arts centres.

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Creative Cocooning

Artist Gillian Cussen joins us from her home in rural Cork with her cat Riley this week! We wanted to say hello to some of our regular visitors who are cocooning, as well as welcoming people who may enjoy a creative activity with no expectations.

The Lonradh programme usually takes place in the gallery with a cuppa, it is an arts programme for older adults and their family members. 

Lonradh is an Irish word which means to illuminate (it is pronounced Lun-rah). Join artist Gillian Cussen in her garden with this short video with an invitation to join her in looking and enjoying being in the moment.

Dandelions

Join artist Gillian Cussen in her garden, this short video is an invitation to stop and look at the dandelions!


You can make comments, suggestions or observations directly to the Crawford education here:

Anne Boddeart
Curator / Programme manager, Learn and Explore:
anneboddaert@crawfordartgallery.ie 
+353 (0)21 490 7857

Emma Klemencic
Education:
emmaklemencic@crawfordartgallery.ie 
+ 353 (0) 21 4907862

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Virtual Extended Thursday Club 2

Like a musician…Learning from the masters “like a musician playing a composition written by someone else”

This week I invite you to learn from the masters

We are going to begin online, with a brilliant lecture about Vincent Van Gogh by Katie Hanson. And we are going to use the screen as creative tool, we will be life drawing Katie Hanson as she delivers her lecture.

Then we will take a leaf from Van Gogh’s book and look at another master work and copy it, not in a slavish way but  “like a musician playing a composition written by someone else”

Online Resources
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mlwoc6RooRQ
Katie Hanson, assistant curator, Paintings, Art of Europe
Oct 6 2015, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Materials

You will need drawing materials -

For my quick sketches, I used a sketchbook and pencils, sharpener, rubber. Use what you have to hand!

The Art Historian by Julie Forrester

Watch Katie Hanson
You are invited to watch this brilliant lecture by Katie Hanson delivered as part of a series of lectures on Vincent Van Gogh at The Boston Museum of Fine Arts

The lecture is great because Hanson is so passionate about her subject. She is beautifully lit from an intriguing angle and there are plenty of pauses as the camera moves from close-ups on her face to wider views which include the works she is speaking about.  As I watched I became fascinated by the forms in Katie Hanson’s face, and I began sketching her as I listened, trying to familiarise myself with her particular features and characteristics and absorbing what she was saying about Van Gogh at the same time. I listened all the way through and then replayed the video stopping to make longer studies. One of the bonuses of using video is the option to stop and catch up or rewind and pause, to go away and come back throughout the lecture all the while bearing in mind the insights the lecturer delivers into Van Gogh’s process.

TASK 1A

You are invited to listen to this fascinating lecture and draw Katie Hanson as she speaks. Treat it as life drawing session - you are doing quick sketches to familiarise yourself with the forms in Hanson’s face.

Try to go with the flow, for your first drawings you will be listening to the lecture and looking at Van Gogh’s works and taking in details about his life and ideas as much as looking at Katie Hanson, so your sketches will be quick and fluid. Make a series of quick gestural drawings without pressing pause.

TASK 1B

Later you can go back later and make longer sketches, pausing the video to capture particular angles and expressions, looking at the play of light and dark across her face. You can use pencil or charcoal for this building layers and carving into the marks you make with your eraser to seek out the play of light across her features. Take as long as you want for this, make your own flow

Consider Vincent Van Gogh’s self training methods “like a musician playing a composition written by someone else”

In the lecture Hanson talks about Van Gogh’s efforts while teaching himself to draw, how much he learnt from looking at the masters, firstly from prints, and then from paintings, looking at mark-making, gesture, composition and colour play.

KH talks about Van Gogh’s photographic visual memory, how particular gestures and motifs in other paintings were burnt into his imagination and how he used them again and again in his own works, like The Sower by Millet (see link below). We can see how Van Gogh also read extensively on contemporary colour theory and we learn how exacting and thorough and inventive he was in his quest to master these skills for himself. (links below)

Van Gogh wasn’t interested in slavishly reproducing what was in front of him -  he describes his approach as being “like a musician playing a composition written by someone else”  - he thinks in terms of music, as well as in terms of colour and composition - I imagine him claiming the masterwork before him like a musical score, embodying the work in a dramatic act of interpretation, perhaps in the way that Sinead O’Connor, interprets Prince’s song “Nothing Compares to You” and owns it! Musicians attempt to claim the songs the sing with the expressive qualities of their own voice, and visual artists do the same.

See the works that Katie Hanson talks about here:

The Sower - Jean-François Millet 1850

Sower after Millet - Vincent Van Gogh 1889

Colour Wheel Charles Blanc 1867
showing the theory of complimentary colours (opposing each other on the wheel) as applied by Vincent Van Gogh

Task 2

In the lecture Hanson talks about Van Gogh’s desire to create portraits as archetypes …”the poet”, “the peasant in the landscape” , “the postman” “the mother at the cradle”  etc. She also talks about how he began to play with colour especially the play between complimentary colours - blue and orange - deep yellow and lavender - greens and reds.

Take a look at this portrait of Deirdre from the Crawford Gallery collection
Deirdre c 1964 bronze with stone base by Jacob Epstein (1880-1975)
Collection of the Crawford Art Gallery

Who is Deirdre? Imagine her as an archetype. All we know about her is she was “Housekeeper” or “Cook” or “Artist’s Model” in Epstein’s household and then she married and went to Australia and most likely inhabited other archetypal personas.…

Using media of your choice crayon, paint, collage etc. I invite you to copy this work, Deirdre like a musician in front of a score. Follow the rhythms and asymmetry of her face, the gesture of her pose, you can go further and invent a background that speaks about this archetypal personage, think about colour and rhythm in your work, make your own reference points, let Deirdre and Jacob Epstein speak to you, and enter the dialogue from your own perspective!

Here is one of my versions following the score set out by Epstein (and Deirdre)

Deirdre after Epstein
You can see more of my responses on Instagram at #thurs_day_club

While I call my version Young Woman, my daughter has called her Mermaid - what do you think? Why not upload your own, it would be fun to see a gallery of Deirdres as different archetypes.
Julie Forrester 2020
Young Woman (Mermaid) after Deirdre by Jacob Epstein

SHARING

You can make comments, suggestions or observations directly to the Crawford education here:

Anne Boddeart
Curator / Programme manager, Learn and Explore:
anneboddaert@crawfordartgallery.ie 
+353 (0)21 490 7857

Emma Klemencic
Education:
emmaklemencic@crawfordartgallery.ie 
+ 353 (0) 21 4907862

Please Share:

Drawing Faces

There are many ways of approaching drawing a face. This timelapse demonstrates techniques like comparing distances, using one feature to measure others, breaking down areas into shapes...

Try something new or find your own method. Draw people around you, use photos or magazine images or take inspiration from portraits in our online collection. 

Here, Avril referred to Fergus Martin’s 'Head No. 32001' from the gallery collection, which can be found on the website. 

Avril O’Brien is an artist and teen tutor.

#crawfordartgalleryhomelife

Click on the video below to view a timelapse of the process

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Figure Drawing

We share tips and tricks for drawing a figure. 
Get the low down on ways of finding proportion.
Stuck for art materials? Raid the kitchen cupboards for materials to create expressive mark-making.

Avril O’Brien, Artist and teen tutor, demonstrates with a portrait from the gallery in this short video and handy downloadable PDF.

#crawfordartgalleryhomelife

CAG.2431 Eileen Healy, Portrait of Cónal Creedon (detail), 2007, pastel on paper, 115 x 75 cm. Presented, Friends of the Crawford Art Gallery, 2007. © the artist
CAG.2431 Eileen Healy, Portrait of Cónal Creedon (detail), 2007, pastel on paper, 115 x 75 cm. Presented, Friends of the Crawford Art Gallery, 2007. © the artist

Drawing is all about Visual problem-solving. Eileen Healy’s ‘Portrait of Conal Creedon’ (2007) which is part of our collection is a stimulus for this figurative drawing video.

HANDY TIPS FOR FIGURE DRAWING

Expression through media, mark-making

MATERIALS

You don’t need a collection of traditional art materials. Look around your home!

Paper- Paper shopping bags, baking paper, cardboard boxes, packaging.

Media - Spices, vegetables, condiments. We used beetroot for dramatic expression. Ground turmeric (a tiny amount added to a little water), soy sauce, tea and coffee created a sepia tone. Think about light, medium and dark tones.

Mark-making tools – what is in the garden? Leaves, sticks. Around the house? Pasta, straws, biros, scrunched up tissue, string.

Click on the video below to view a timelapse of the process

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Colour our Collection

Download a colouring sheet and break out your pencils, crayons and stickers!

Jump to your favourite image and download the PDF file to colour:



Laocoon and His Sons

Hagesandros and Polydoros Athenodoros
Laocoon and his Sons

About the artwork
This artwork tells a story. Poseidon is a powerful sea god and he sends serpents to attack Laocoon and his two sons! Laocoon faced the wrath of the Greek gods because he tried to foil a plan to invade the city of Troy. Greek soldiers had made a huge wooden horse, which they pretended was a present, but really it was filled with an army ready to attack the city of Troy.

Download the pdf here

You can view the original artwork here

Harry Clarke The Arras Rich with Horseman (Design for the Eve of St. Agnes Window) c.1923

Harry Clarke
The Arras Rich with Horseman
(Design for the Eve of St. Agnes Window)
c.1923

About the artwork
Harry loved stories, he was inspired by all kinds of storytelling, fairy tales, poems, spooky ghost stories and romantic legends. Harry made this drawing when he was working out ideas for the design of a stained glass window. In this picture, two characters are running away from a castle on a very cold and wintery night. As they flee they pass a woven cloth called an arras, it is a tapestry that is sewn with horses and woven like their very own dreams.

Download the pdf here

You can view the original artwork here

George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson A Frigate Being Wrecked off a Rocky Coast 1849

George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson
A Frigate Being Wrecked off a Rocky Coast
1849

About the artwork
George was born in Cobh over 200 years ago, he sailed the seas working as a ship’s carpenter. George taught himself to paint. He painted Cobh harbour in storm, calm and in sunshine. His paintings show boats of the time with curious names like brigs, schooners, steamers and cutters! In this painting, George imagines a ship battling a storm on the rocky Cork coastline.

Download the pdf here

You can view the original artwork here

Edith Somerville 
The Goose Girl
1888

Edith Somerville
The Goose Girl
1888

About the artwork
This young girl has made friends with the farmyard goose and does not want to see him being served for dinner! The artist Edith Somerville was born in Corfu in 1858, but she spent much of her life living in Castletownsend, West Cork. 

Throughout her life, she painted and sketched daily, while successfully publishing short stories and novels with her cousin Violet Martin. 

Download pdf here

You can view the original artwork here

James Barry

James Barry
Portraits of Barry and Burke in the Characters of Ulysses and his Companion Fleeing from the Cave of Polyphemus
c.1776

Cork-born artist James Barry gave this work a snappy title Portraits of Barry and Burke in the Characters of Ulysses and his Companion Fleeing from the Cave of Polyphemus! James Barry was born in Water Lane, Cork City in 1741. In this picture, he imagines that his friend and teacher, the philosopher Edmund Burke, is a legendary Greek hero called Ulysses. They are trying to escape from a monster called Polyphemus who is a cyclops, shown hunched in the background. A cyclops is a giant monster from legend with just one eye!

Download the PDF here

You can view the original artwork here

Colour the collection bar image

John Lavery
The Red Rose
1923 

About the artwork: 
This is a very romantic painting of a woman holding a lovely red rose. The woman’s name is Hazel Lavery. It is one of over 400 portraits that John Lavery, her husband, made of her. One of his portraits of Hazel even appeared on Irish banknotes in 1928. Can you imagine your own face printed on money? The Red Rose started off as another person’s portrait, but John decided it would be better to paint his wife again! John painted over this canvas several times. So why not experiment? Raid the house for recycling materials to reimagine this picture with collage.

Download PDF here

View the original artwork here

Colour the collection bar image

Gerard Dillon
Old Woman & Washing
c. 1959

About the artwork:
The artist Gerard Dillon loved the people of Connemara, he wanted to show life in the West of Ireland. This painting shows the inside of a cottage before cookers, washing machines, central heating, widescreen televisions or even hoovers! The woman who lives here keeps her home spick and span, her washing is drying and her teapots are warming in front of the fire. Look, there is a place waiting for you by the cosy fire! Imagine what stories this woman could tell.

Download pdf here

View the original artwork here

Daniel Maclise
Francois I and Diane de Poitiers
1834

About the artwork: 
What is this fellow holding in his hand? Does his face look angry, sneaky, surprised or sad? This character is a jester from a painting by Daniel Maclise. 

Daniel was an artist from Cork and he loved history, theatre and storytelling. His painting tells the story of a woman called Diane who comes to the King of France to beg for her father’s release from prison. Her father is released, but Diane must stay with the King.

Can you imagine what happens next?

Download the PDF here

View the original artwork here

John Baptist Closterman
Portrait of a Gentleman
c.1710

About the artwork: 
This painting is over 300 years old! It was painted in the 17th century, photography had not been invented and only the richest people could afford to have a portrait painted. We do not know the name of the gentleman in this portrait, it is a mystery. Feeling playful? Give this gentleman a cunning disguise to add to the mystery! 

Download PDF here

View the original artwork here


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Crawford Art Gallery

Crawford Art Gallery