Talking Pictures Week 16: Boxes

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork

This artwork was created by an artist called Colin Middleton, who was born in Belfast in 1910. He was a Surrealist, which meant he liked to put unexpected things together to create fantastical, dream-like scenes in his paintings. Surrealism was a movement in art and literature that emerged in the early twentieth century. It was all about embracing the powers of our imagination, fantasies and dreams to produce sights that had never been seen before!

Look closely

Look closely at the painting. What do you think is inside all those boxes? Could it be more birds. The painting is called ‘Market Day’ so do you think the lady is going to the market to sell the boxes? What will she buy with the money she gets for the boxes?

Let’s sing!

You loved singing in last week’s Talking Pictures right? So let’s sing again. Here is a song for this week’s boxes theme. This song is by Malvina Reynolds and it is very catchy. You can find the song on Youtube and sing along with the words below.This lovely painting could inspire you to sing a love song to Cork! We’re going to sing a famous Cork song called ‘The Banks of My Own Lovely Lee’. Maybe you have learned this song in school or maybe your parents know it. Here is the first verse for you to sing and you could find the rest of the song online.

Little Boxes – Malvina Reynolds

Little boxes on the hillside
Little boxes made of ticky-tacky
Little boxes on the hillside
Little boxes all the same
There's a green one and a pink one
And a blue one and a yellow one
And they're all made out of ticky-tacky
And they all look just the same

And the people in the houses
All went to the university
Where they were put in boxes
And they came out all the same
And there's doctors and lawyers
And business executives
And they're all made out of ticky-tacky
And they all look just the same

Let’s Play Dots and Boxes Game

All you need to play this game is a pencil, paper and another person to play with! Start by making an empty grid of dots, then take turns drawing a single horizontal or vertical line between two dots. The player who draws the fourth line to make a complete box wins a point and writes their initial in the box to record it. When all the dots have been joined by lines to make boxes, the game is over and the players count up their scores. The winner is the person who has earned the most points.

Here's a demonstration to help you get started:

dots and boxes

Activity Dice

Activity Dice

Click here to download a printable PDF version of this activity dice.

Remember to ask a grown-up for help with cutting along the black lines and gluing or taping your dice!

Let’s make a cardboard box monster

Cardboard boxes are very fun to play with. With a little bit of drawing or even just a bit of imagination a cardboard box can become anything you want!

You could make…a spaceship, a boat, a fish tank, a robot, a castle, a dinosaur, a car.

Here is an example of a cardboard monster that you could make. Use some markers or crayons to draw on eyes and a mouth, horns and hair on an old cardboard box.

Look at the silly socks on the bird and the donkey in the painting above…Could you use silly socks as feet for your box monster.

You could add feathers or glitter or shiny wrappers from sweets, whatever you have at home. See what you can make! Have fun!

Box Monster

Answers to last week’s Cork Slang Quiz

Cork Slang Answers

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Activities and illustrations by Hazel Hurley.


We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Please share:

Talking Pictures Week 15: Cork, like!

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork

Custom-House

This painting was created around the year 1750 by the artist John Butts. You can see the city of Cork at a time when it was a lot smaller. You can also see the old Custom House which is now the Crawford Art Gallery. A Custom House was where goods were checked and taxed on their way in or out of the city. The tallest building you can see is St. Anne’s Church or the ‘Shandon Bells’, a famous symbol of Cork city to this day.

Look closely

Look closely at the painting… Can you see how much Cork has changed? Do you recognise any of the buildings or places in the picture? What other details can you see? Do you like the colours in the painting? What colours can you see?

Let’s sing a song!

This lovely painting could inspire you to sing a love song to Cork! We’re going to sing a famous Cork song called ‘The Banks of My Own Lovely Lee’. Maybe you have learned this song in school or maybe your parents know it. Here is the first verse for you to sing and you could find the rest of the song online.

‘The Banks of My Own Lovely Lee’ by Dick Forbes and J.C. Flanahan

How oft do my thoughts in their fancy take flight
To the home of my childhood away,
To the days when each patriot's vision seem'd bright
Ere I dreamed that those joys should decay.
When my heart was as light as the wild winds that blow
Down the Mardyke through each elm tree,
Where we sported and play'd 'neath each green leafy shade
On the banks of my own lovely Lee,
Where we sported and play'd 'neath each green leafy shade
On the banks of my own lovely Lee.

This song is all about a man remembering where he used to play when he was a child, ‘neath the green leafy shade’ meaning under the trees, in the Mardyke in Cork city. Where is your favourite place to play? If you live in Cork city do you go for walks by the Marina? Do you go to the Lough to feed the ducks? Do you walk down the Mardyke to play in Fitzgerald’s Park and cross the Shakey Bridge? If you live outside of Cork city maybe you go for walks in a forest park, or at the beach or in the countryside?

What do you like about these places you visit?

What do you see and hear?

Are there animals in this place?

What games do you play?

Maybe you could write your own song about your favourite place to play!

Let’s Play Picky!

In the past, Cork youngsters would play a game on the streets called Picky, kind of like hopscotch. You can play too by first marking out the six squares with chalk or tape and then following the instructions on the picture below. It’s harder than you’d think! Have fun!

Picky

Cork Slang Words Quiz

Can you match the Cork slang words to the pictures? Maybe ask an older Cork person, like a neighbour or a grandparent, to help you. Answers in next week’s Talking Pictures.

Cork Slang

Bazzer             Gatch              Feen                Balm out         Beoir               Sconce Rasa                Ecca                 Hopper        Ucks                Pana

What other Cork slang words can you find out? Can you find out the meaning of ‘Up for the ba’? It’s a good one!

Let’s Imagine!

Now that you know some Cork words, can you imagine what these two ye olde Cork feens are saying to each other? Use the words above to tell us what they were saying.

Feens

You can see the iconic St. Anne’s Church in the painting, known locally as the ‘Shandon Bells’. This is a bell tower with 4 clocks and a golden fish at the very top, known as the ‘Goldie Fish’. Nearby the tower is the Cork Butter Museum, where you can learn about the history of butter making and selling around Cork.

Now let’s make our own goldie fish, using a goldie butter wrapper!

Goldie fish drawing

First, take a butter wrapper and cut off a piece to make it into a square shape. Next, smooth out the creases with your hand.

Kerrygold

Then follow this video by PaperFoldingChannel to make a simple origami fish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axHwJgs8tAs&t=205s

At the end you can draw in an eye or add a googly eye if you have one.

Kerrygold Fish

Now that you have your own Goldie Fish you can imagine taking them on an adventure around Cork City!

Origami paper folding is from Japan, not Cork, and there are lots of other origami animals you can make by following Youtube videos if you have enjoyed making this fish.

See you next week for more Talking Pictures!

Credits:
Activities devised and designed by Hazel Hurley unless otherwise stated.
Song Credit: ‘The Banks of My Own Lovely Lee’ by Dick Forbes and J.C. Flanahan.
Picky Game Credit: “Grattan Street Stories” by Cork Folklore Project, Kieran Murphy.
Cork Slang words consultant: Tadhg Dennehy.
Origami Fish Video Credit: PaperFoldingChannel.

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.


Answers to last week’s bug word scramble:

eeb = bee

sinla = snail

apws = wasp

ydadrbli = ladybird

edirsp = spider

rtybftuel = butterfly

hmto = moth

citralelrpa = caterpillar

etlebe = beetle

tan = ant

Were you able to unscramble them all?

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Please share:

Talking Pictures Week 14: The Piping Faun

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
This sculpture is a cast (or copy) of a marble sculpture that is in the Louvre, a large museum in Paris, France. The faun is seen looking relaxed with a cloak around his shoulders, playing a pipe or flute. You can see this sculpture in the Sculpture Gallery in the Crawford Art Gallery – that’s the room with the blue walls and all the white statues.  There are a few faun sculptures in the Crawford collection – but what is a faun?

What is a faun?
A faun is a half-man, half-goat creature that features in old Greek and Roman mythology stories. Fauns are often depicted as silly but peaceful creatures and are sometimes shown playing a pipe in the forest. This faun sculpture does not have goat legs but we can tell he is a faun from his big pointy ears!

Let’s Imagine

If you could be half-human, half-animal…which animal would you choose?

What would you be called?

Would you live on the land or in the water or in the sky?

How would you move around? Would you fly or slither or swim?

What noises would you make?

What would you eat for breakfast?

What would you do for fun?

Would you go to school or would you have a job?

What creatures would you have as friends?

What games would you play with those friends?

Let’s make poetry!

Seán the Faun goes on an adventure! Use the rhyming words below to make up a poem or story about Seán the Faun…

Lawn

Drawn

On

Dawn

Prawn

Yawn

Gone

Hello Mr. Tumnus!

Probably the most famous faun in the world is Mr. Tumnus from The Chronicles of Narnia series of stories by C.S. Lewis. Mr. Tumnus is a faun who lives in Narnia, wears a red scarf, and carries parcels and an umbrella. A little girl called Lucy meets Mr. Tumnus when she stumbles into the snowy land of Narnia through the back of a wardrobe. Mr. Tumnus then invites her to tea….

This is only the beginning of Lucy’s adventures in Narnia with her brothers and sister. You could continue the story by reading the book series or watching the films that have been made based on the books.

Musical Statues

Fauns love to dance and play the pipe. Maybe the statue of the piping faun dances in the gallery when nobody is watching! We can be dancing statues too…

Here is how you play musical statues at home:

One person plays music on a phone or CD player while everyone else dances around the room. When they stop the music everyone must freeze like a statue and stay very still. The person who stopped the music walks around the room and inspects that everyone is staying still. If anyone moves, they are out. Continue playing and stopping the music until there is only one person left standing and they are the winner!

Let’s Discover

Maybe you’d like to do more research on mythical creatures and find out more stories? Are there any creatures from Irish mythology that are half-human and half-animal? How could you find out about these? Maybe you could look at a book, search on Google or ask your grandparents or an older neighbour.

See what you can discover! Maybe you’d like to write about the creatures or draw them?

Let’s Draw!

Consequences Drawing Game

Drawing game
Drawing game 2

Can you see what cool half-human, half-animal creatures you can make working together with your family or friends?

First, fold a piece of paper into 4 sections. Start out by drawing a head at the top and fold over the paper to hide your drawing, but mark in lines to show where your drawing ends, as shown below. Pass the paper to someone else and they can draw the next section of the creature’s body, without seeing the drawing that came before. Take turns drawing sections until the body is complete and then unfold to see the crazy creature you have made!

Hammerhead

Lastly, you could draw in a background for the creature to show where they are and what they are doing.

Have fun!

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.


Answers to last week’s bug word scramble:

eeb = bee

sinla = snail

apws = wasp

ydadrbli = ladybird

edirsp = spider

rtybftuel = butterfly

hmto = moth

citralelrpa = caterpillar

etlebe = beetle

tan = ant

Were you able to unscramble them all?

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Please share:

Talking Pictures Week 13: Butterflies and Caterpillars

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
This bright painting of butterflies and caterpillars was created using oil paint by the artist Robert Matthews. There are lots of different species (types) of butterflies in this painting. You can see the artist has signed his name (RM) down the bottom right of the painting but it looks like another caterpillar.

Look closely at the painting
How many butterflies can you count?
Are any two of the butterflies the same?
Can you remember seeing any of these butterflies outdoors?
How many caterpillars can you count in the grass at the bottom of the painting?
Did you know that a caterpillar turns into a butterfly!?

Life cycle of a butterfly

Let’s Pretend!

Can you act out the life cycle of a butterfly?

Start out as an egg rolled up tight in a ball, staying very still.

Next, hatch out into a caterpillar crawling around on your belly, with your hands close by your side, wriggling on the floor. Pretend to munch on some leaves.

Next, roll up tight in like you are in a cocoon, you could put a blanket on you too to look more cocoon-like. Stay very still and then start to wriggle.

Finally, you can break out of the cocoon and fly around like a big beautiful colourful butterfly.

Tell a Story!
Kailey the Caterpillar was sad. She wished she was a butterfly so she could fly high in the sky. Kailey crawled under a tree where she met Mrs. Ladybird. Mrs. Ladybird saw that Kailey looked sad and said…

(Continue telling the story and draw it out if you’d like)

Bug Word Scramble…Can you unscramble the different bug names?

eeb

sinla

apws

ydadrbli

edirsp

rtybftuel

hmto

citralelrpa

etlebe

tan

Nature Scavenger Hunt
Draw out this table at home (or you could ask your adult to take a screenshot on their phone and draw the ticks onto the picture on the phone). Out in the garden (or the park or countryside), see if you can find everything on the list and tick them off as you do. Some things may be easier to find than others but keep looking!

Let’s Make!

Circle Caterpillar

Circle caterpillar

How to make a Circle Caterpillar:
Cut out circles, all the same size, out of coloured paper or colourful plastic or paper packaging. You could use a circular lid or jar to draw around to get a neat circle. Arrange the circles so they are overlapping like in the picture and stick down onto a background of your choice using glue or the simple paste glue from the recipe below. Cut out two small circles for eyes and draw in the mouth and the dots in the eyes. Cut out strips of card or packaging and curl up the ends to make feet and antennae (feelers) and stick these on to complete your caterpillar.

Cut circle

How to make a simple glue at home:
Mix one part flour with one part water (eg, 1 cup flour and 1 cup water, or 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 cup water) until you get a thick glue-like consistency. Add a bit more water if it's too thick. Mix well with a spoon to get rid of all the lumps. Add in 2 teaspoons of salt at the end to prevent it from going mouldy. Now you are ready to use your paste glue to make a caterpillar or other crafts!

Answers to last week’s Spot the Difference: Did you find them all?

game-of-card
Image Credit: Norah Brigid Ni Chuill (1924/25 - 1993), Game of Cards, 1959
spot-the-difference-answers
Spot the difference answers

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Please share:

Talking Pictures Week 12: Traveller Pride

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
This painting is called ‘Game of Cards’ and was created in 1959. The painting shows a big family who have parked up their wagon or ‘vardo’, their horse is munching on grass in the background. The whole family is playing a game of cards outdoors with mammy and the youngest baby watching. Talking Pictures would like to mark Cork Traveller Pride festival which celebrates the culture and traditions of the Traveller community.

Spot the Difference

spot the difference

Spot the Difference! There are 8 differences in the picture above compared to the original image below. Look closely…Can you find them all? The answers will be in next week’s ‘Talking Pictures’!

Game of Cards
Game of Cards, 1959 (Original image)

Imagine
Imagine if you lived in a horse-drawn wagon and travelled from place to place…

Set up Camp

Why don’t you set up camp in your house or garden! You could use blankets and pillows to make a camp fort. Use clothes pegs to clip the blankets together and use shoes to keep them in place. Build around what you’ve got…In between couches and armchairs works well, or under a table. Make it nice and cosy.

Now…how will you entertain yourself in your camp…how about some storytelling?

Storytelling
Irish Travellers have a long tradition of storytelling. Storytelling is a great way to entertain each other on a long journey or when camping.

Folded Story

deep fish

Write out the first line of the story and then fold over the piece of paper and give it to someone else allowing them to see only the previous line.

caught a fish

When you are finished, unfold the piece of paper and see what silly story you have!
You can think of your own first line, or here are some to get you started…

In traditional Traveller culture, stories were told without writing them down, people just remembered all the stories and passed them down to their children and grandchildren. Can you tell a story without reading it? By going around in a circle and saying the next line of the story..? Or by saying just one word each? See how silly the story can get!

You can think of your own first line, or here are some to get you started…

Card games… Let’s play

The people in this painting are playing cards. Most people have a deck of cards in their house so let’s play with cards too! If you don’t have a deck of cards at home you can make some on paper.  Ask your adult to show you some fun card games like ‘Go Fish’, ‘Pairs’ and ‘Snap’ but right now we’re going to use cards to do a fun workout!

Playing Card Workout

This is a fun, creative way of getting some exercise with your friends or family using a deck of cards. Take turns picking a card from the deck and do the exercise below that matches. The number on the card shows you the number of times to do the exercise. If you get a joker you must do 10 burpees! Make sure you take rests and maybe you could think of other exercises to add in too! Have fun.

card workout

Number on Card = How many you do!
J=11, Q=12, K=13, A=14
Joker = 10 burpees

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Talking Picture week 11 was devised by Hazel Hurley
(see her work at hazelhurley.com)

Please share:

Talking Pictures Week 11: Shadows and Silhouettes

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
This artwork is a silhouette self-portrait by Augustin Amant Edouart, a French artist who moved to Cork in 1834, where he made hundreds of portraits of people in Cork city and all around Ireland. Edouart used fine sharp scissors to perfectly snip a portrait of somebody out of black paper in just 5 minutes. Here is Edouart himself dressed in fine clothing with a top hat and cane.

What is a silhouette?
A silhouette is the image of a person, animal, object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single colour, usually black, seen against a light background.

What would happen if…

Silly Hats
This man, Augustin Edouart, is holding a big tall maybe a bit silly hat but it didn’t seem silly at the time because that was the fashion back then!

What if he had a different hat? What hat can you imagine on his head... What hat would he wear if he was sailing a ship, or barbecuing or if he was a Viking or if he was a clown? Think of all the silly hats you can imagine.

Silhouette Shape Shifter!
Because we can only see his silhouette, we don’t know if Augustin is a man sitting on a chair or is he a man with crab legs who is really a crab-man! What are all those places listed on the wall behind him? Is Augustin a shapeshifter, changing into a different animal for every place he visits?

So if in Cork he is a Crab


In Kinsale, he is a K_____________

In Dublin, he is a D_____________

In Glasgow, he is a G_____________

In London, he is a L_____________

In Eton, he is an E_____________

In Oxford, he is an O_____________

In Perth, he is a P_____________

Shadow fun… Let’s play

Match the Shadows
Can you tell which shadow on the left belongs to which picture on the right? Could it be a lady in a fancy dress or is it just a fancy bird?

Match the shadows

Shadow Monster
These days it is very sunny so we have shadows to play with outside. Can you make some funny shadow of yourself using some objects?  What are you? Are you an animal? Or something else? Something scary? Ask someone to take a picture of your funny silhouettes we would love to see them!

Make sure you wear sunscreen if you are standing in the sun for a long time.

Human Sundial
Can we use our shadows to tell the time? Our shadows are shorter or longer at different times in the day. If you have a piece of chalk at home (or little stones) stand in a place with space around you and mark around your feet. Come back and place your feet in that spot every hour and get someone to draw or place stones around your shadow, and mark in the time. You can see how the sun has moved because of where your shadows were. The next day come back and see can you tell the time based on the markings you made the day before.

Shadow Fun…Let’s Draw!
Let’s use shadows to help us draw! Stand some of your toys or different objects from your house on pieces of paper like in the photo below and draw around their shadows. The evening time is best for this as the shadows will be longer. Next you can take the objects or toys away and colour in the drawings and add more creative details. What is going on in the scene? Is there a story you can tell from the drawings?

Again with all these outdoor shadow games make sure you wear sunscreen! Have fun!

Source: Mini First Aid
https://wolverhampton.minifirstaid.co.uk/

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Talking Picture week 11 was devised by Hazel Hurley
(see her work at hazelhurley.com)

Please share:

Talking Pictures Week 10: Wet Pet

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
A wet pet! This inky watercolour drawing is by an Irish artist called Michael Beirne. It shows a pet dog called Judy Boy. She is a wonderfully hairy dog! Michael has diluted his paint with lots of water to make this artwork and we can see all of the drips running off the page. 

Let’s play 
This picture does not have a background: can you draw a background for Judy Boy? 
Has she had a bath?
Was she caught in a storm?
Has she gone for a swim in the river?
Where does Judy Boy live?
What happens next?

Write a story all about Judy Boy
Can you imagine what Judy Boy is like?
What funny habits does she have?
What does she like to eat?
Where does she sleep?
Does she do any tricks?
How would you care for Judy Boy?

Challenge a grown-up!
Ask a grown-up to make up a really silly poem about a wet pet
Give a grown-up marks out of ten
Wet pet, call the vet, I bet! sunset, regret, not yet! chess set, alphabet, upset, omelette, fishing net, clarinet, Bernadette and the horsey set, internet, rocket jet, don’t fret! Have we met? sweat, baguette, sunset, ink jet, drum set, forget, film set, carpet, toilet, pirouette, rosette, duet, launderette!...

My pet
Imagine your own special pet
Imagine that you can have any pet in the world…..
Would you choose a wooly sheepdog, a posh poodle, a sausage dog, a horse, a pig, a parrot, a snake, a lion, a precious butterfly, an ant, a dragon or a dinosaur….

Pet adventure
Use old magazines, newspapers and scraps of coloured paper to make a pet adventure
Cut out pictures and scraps of colour that you like
Don’t worry about being too perfect
Have some silly fun placing your scraps onto a page to make a story
Anything can happen in your collage!
We think that Judy Boy might be a sea dog
Here are her friends sailing in a little boat:

Here’s one we made earlier!
Here’s one we made earlier!

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

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Talking Pictures Week 9: Moon Horse

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
This is a copy of a sculpture made 3,000 years ago by the ancient Greeks and Romans! The ancient Greeks believed that a goddess called Selene carried the moon across the sky each night. They imagined her driving a horse-drawn chariot with two white horses. Selene’s crown lit up the moon as her white horses galloped across the night sky.

Let’s Imagine!
Can you imagine Selene riding her silver chariot over your house as you sleep?
Can you draw Selene and her crown that lights the moon?
What does Selene look like in your imagination? Is she ghostly or dreamy or powerful? Is she happy or lonely or bossy? Is she young or old, tiny or huge? Is she singing or laughing or very quiet?
Imagine that you are Selene, travelling across the night sky, what do you see?

Draw a creature or fantastic object to pull the moon across the sky…

Make your own moon horse!

You could use modelling clay, plasticine, tinfoil, or make your own play dough.

Here is one we made at home.

Simple playdough recipe:
Ingredients: 1 cup of flour, half a cup of salt, 1 teaspoon of oil.
Method: Mix in a bowl, if the mixture is too wet add more flour.
Here is one that our friend Nell made in the picture below.

Here is one we made at home.

Let’s Play!
Can you make a moon telescope?
What can you spy?… moon rabbits collecting moon eggs, strange mountains and seas, moon flowers or a moon cat or a moon disco…

Here is one we made at home.

Create your own moon story
Fill your own moon with patterns, shapes, people and animals, the sky is the limit! Or perhaps you fancy some cosmic colouring?

Take inspiration from Cork artist Ailbhe Barrett to create your own fantastic designs! Download colouring sheets here.

Ailbhe Barrett, Moons. © the artist.

Find more moon inspired work in the gallery by using the links below!

CAG.1877 James Arthur O'Connor, Moonlight Scene, c.1835, oil on canvas, 44 x 55 cm. Donated, 1998 (Fr. McGrath Bequest). © Crawford Art Gallery
James Arthur O'Connor, Moonlight Scene, c.1835, oil on canvas, Crawford Art Gallery
CAG.784 Spanish School, Platter or Tazza, 18th century. © Crawford Art Gallery
Spanish School, Platter or Tazza, 18th century. Crawford Art Gallery

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

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Talking Pictures Week 8: Would you rather...?

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

Look closely at the artwork below

Who would you rather be?
Pick a character and write a story about their day.
Describe where they live.
Imagine what happens next?
Who do they meet?
What language do they speak?

Tom Campbell, Series of 61 Water colours, 2011, © the artist
Tom Campbell, Series of 61 Water colours, 2011, © the artist

About this artwork

Tom Campbell is an artist from Scotland who lives in Cork. He loves the circus, he can unicycle and he plays the ukulele. In this artwork Tom has invented 58 imaginary characters! To make these drawings Tom used the pages of an old book, each page begins to tell a new story.

Let's play!

Would you rather be a dog or a cat?

L. Michael Beirne, Judy Boy, 1995, watercolour on paper, © the artist. 
R. Patrick Hennessy, Self Portrait and Cat, 1978, oil on canvas, © the artist.
L. Michael Beirne, Judy Boy, 1995, watercolour on paper, © the artist.
R. Patrick Hennessy, Self Portrait and Cat, 1978, oil on canvas, © the artist.

Would you rather eat soup or cheese?

Alfred Bendiner, Soup Boy and Cheese Tray, water colour on paper, © the artist.

Would you rather a snowy day or a sunny day?

L. Anne S. King-Harman, Snow in Wicklow, gouache on paper, © the artist.
R. Martin F. Mahony, Summer, oil on canvas, © the artist.
L. Anne S. King-Harman, Snow in Wicklow, gouache on paper, © the artist.
R. Martin F. Mahony, Summer, oil on canvas, © the artist.

Would you rather a pet panther or a butterfly?

L. Florencio Curian, The Black Panther, stone, © the artist. 
R. Lace butterfly, 17th century.
L. Florencio Curian, The Black Panther, stone, © the artist.
R. Lace butterfly, 17th century.

Would you rather climb to the top of a mountain or dive into the sea?

L. George K Gillespie, Owenmore River and Mayo Hills, oil on board, © the artist. 
R. Raymond Kelleher, Seascape, acrylic on board © the artist.
L. George K Gillespie, Owenmore River and Mayo Hills, oil on board, © the artist.
R. Raymond Kelleher, Seascape, acrylic on board © the artist.

Would you rather live in a mansion or a cottage?

L. Mark Hathaway, Antebellum Mansion Louisanna, 1993, watercolour on paper © the artist.
R.  Seamus Murphy, Untitled, 1935, watercolour on paper © the artist.
L. Mark Hathaway, Antebellum Mansion Louisanna, 1993, watercolour on paper © the artist.
R.  Seamus Murphy, Untitled, 1935, watercolour on paper © the artist.

Would you rather grow an enormous hand or an elephant's trunk?

L. Kathy Prendergast, Hand, chalk pastel on paper © the artist.   
R. Debbie Godsell, Lady, 2002, photo intaglio on paper © the artist.
L. Kathy Prendergast, Hand, chalk pastel on paper © the artist.   
R. Debbie Godsell, Lady, 2002, photo intaglio on paper © the artist.

Would you rather be a king or a knight?

L. Seamus Murphy, Seated King, c. 1931, plaster
R. Robert Gibbings, Illustration for 'Le Morte d'Arthur’, wood engraving, © the artist.
L. Seamus Murphy, Seated King, c. 1931, plaster
R. Robert Gibbings, Illustration for 'Le Morte d'Arthur’, wood engraving, © the artist.

Would you rather live inside the moon or the sun?

L. Spanish plate, 18th century
R. Noel Sheridan, Midnight Sun, oil on board, © the artist.
L. Spanish plate, 18th century
R. Noel Sheridan, Midnight Sun, oil on board, © the artist.

We would love to hear your stories and artworks inspired by Talking Pictures! Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the #crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

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Talking Pictures Week 7: Boat!

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork

This artwork is a boat made by an Irish artist called Hugh Lorigan. It has green sails that look like curled leaves and two golden horns. If you look very closely you can see that Hugh has written his name on his boat. This boat is made from clay and is heavy, so it cannot float. 

Hugh fired (in other words, cooked!)  the raw clay at a very high temperature in a ceramic oven called a kiln. Ceramic is the word that we use to describe finished clay artwork.

Hugh has described working with clay as being hard work, when he is lifting and kneading large slabs of clay, but also like magic! He can never be sure exactly how his artwork will look when he opens the kiln door because ceramic artists use chemical powders and a liquid called glaze which both interact with heat. 

Let’s Play!

Imagine that you are the captain of this boat.

Perhaps you are a jolly sailor or a cruel pirate!

Will you look for treasure or are you spoiling for a fight?

Who is your ship mate?

Will you bring your friends or your family on your voyage?

If your family are really annoying you can always make them walk the plank!

Invent your own characters, who will hoist the sails, cook the grub, catch the fish and swab the decks!

What will you bring on your voyage?

Draw a big cloth sack and fill it with all of the things that you will need

What food will you bring? 

Will you need a sword, rope, magic potions, your toys, a torch, your pet, your granny, chocolate, a teddy, warm socks?

Design a flag for your ship and draw a map.

Where will you travel to?

You can travel anywhere that you wish!

Under the sea or sail through the clouds in your sky boat

Look through your telescope what can you spy?

Maybe you are missing someone, who will you visit?

If you are a pirate looking for treasure, draw a map, include all of the obstacles that you face

What treasure do you seek, gold, chocolate or a faraway city!

Cast your nets into the sea and write a story to describe what you find.

Giant spider crabs, whispering sea shells that grant wishes, enormous clams that hold pearls, a colossal squid that you are the very first to see, a lion’s mane jelly fish, a map inside a bottle, a mermaid, an under water city, a magic key, a mysterious empty ship with torn sails 

Tinfoil boat

Design a boat!

Can you draw what you think this boat looks like on the inside?

Design your own quarters, will you sleep in bunk beds or a swinging hammock?

Design a boat for the future, will your boat have wings or be driven by a computer.

Give your boat a name.

Tinfoil boat in sink

Floaty fun in the kitchen sink!

Raid the recycling bin for boat-making materials!

Can you find things that will float?

You could experiment with a milk carton, plastic container, bottle, egg boxes, corks, take away containers

Ask a grown-up if you can use some tinfoil or kitchen sponges to make little boats to float in the kitchen sink

Make a tiny ocean in a dish, if you have access to a garden find some stones for rocks, and leaves for seaweed

Some of your small toys might like to dive into your ocean!

If you have ice cubes experiment with an icy sea, imagine glaciers

Use a squirt of washing up liquid and a wooden spoon to make your boats swirl in gently bubbling waves and sea-froth.

Tinfoil boat on sink

Ahoy Ship-mates! We used some frozen beans for tiny weights to hold our boat steady.

Our boat was taken over by a naughty pirate!

Our boat was taken over by a naughty pirate!

We would love to hear your kitchen sink adventures…. Tag us in your uploaded photos of your designs on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using #crawfordartgalleryhomelife

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Talking Pictures Week 6: I Spy

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday. 

About the object

A telescope helps us to see things that are far away. Inside this telescope there are pieces of curved glass, these are like the lenses of glasses used for eyeglasses. The first telescope was invented over 400 years ago and was called ‘the looker’! Pirates and sea captains carried some of the earliest telescopes and these were called spy glasses. The family that owned this telescope lived in a big house on a hill, here in Cork, 300 years ago. They could spy all of the ships sailing up and down the river Lee.

Let’s Play 'I Spy'!

Can you spy…?:

Three things that are green

Something round

Something scratchy

Something that is very light

Something that is strong

Something that is yellow

Something that is smooth

Something that is square

Something that is fuzzy

Something precious

A shadow

Something tiny

Two things that are blue

Something old

Something that can float

Look out of your window: can you draw what you see?

Missing your friend? Ask an adult to help you send your drawing to your friend.

Ask your friend to draw what they see from their window so that you can see what they see, from faraway!

Imagine that you can live anywhere in the world. Look through a pretend telescope and draw what you spy!

Here are some ideas: mountains, snow, sky scrapers, a boat, flowers, a desert, hot air balloons, the beach, a huge city, Disneyland, a forest, a zoo, a castle, a tropical island, a sweet factory, a new friend, a bouncy castle, a swimming pool, pirates, a tornado, a tree house….

Make your own pretend telescope complete with a funny friend to join in your spying!
Above: Make your own pretend telescope complete with a funny friend to join in your spying!

Make a pretend telescope! 

  1. Use the cardboard tube from a toilet roll and a piece of clear plastic from the recycling bin.
  2. Use a marker and the cardboard tube to trace a circle onto the plastic.
  3. Draw a tiny friend, a little animal or a ship onto the circle of plastic with a permanent marker.
  4. Use a small piece of sellotape to attach the plastic circle to the end of the cardboard roll.
  5. Decorate your telescope and have lots of silly fun!

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Talking Pictures Week 5: Bandit

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday. 

About the artwork

This artwork is a painting on paper by an artist called Leo McCann. It is called Self-Portrait as a Bandit. A portrait is a word used in art to describe a painting, drawing or sculpture of a person. In this artwork Leo is a robber, a bandit. He is wearing a big hat and a scarf around his face to disguise his appearance.

Let’s Play!

Can you imagine that you are somebody else?

Draw your portrait as somebody else

Are you…….a robber, a princess, a very angry person, Spiderman, a baby, an explorer, soldier, a grown up, a man with a long, long beard, a nurse, a builder, bald, a rock star, a scientist, a pirate, a cowboy, a baby fox in its burrow, a wizard, a waitress, a fire fighter, a king, a mum or a granny

Can you imagine yourself as a tiny baby? Describe your day.

Imagine yourself in 50 years’ time: what will you look like?

Can you describe your life in the future?

Let’s Put on a Disguise!

The word disguise means to change the way you look, so that other people do not recognise you.

Find things around your home that you can use to create a disguise

Ask an adult if you can try on some of their clothes, maybe a coat and a pair of shoes

Make a disguise, with a hat, glasses, sheets, blankets or tea towels, a scarf.

Are you an adventurer in hiding? Who are you hiding from and why?

Go on a top-secret mission as a spy, draw a suitcase with 5 different disguises for your secret mission.

Draw some tiny but fantastic costumes: try out different hair styles, big dresses, coats, makeup, moustaches, false teeth, goggles, crowns, cloaks, veils, a shield.

Write a story about being in disguise? You could imagine that you have travelled to a different time or place.

Maybe you miss your grandparents, your aunt or uncle or your cousins. Pretend that you have swapped lives with them, what would that be like?

Perhaps you are a bandit! Pretend that you are a bandit who has robbed lots of money, how will you spend your riches? 

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Talking Pictures Week 4: Off to the Circus!

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday. 

About the artwork

Finola Leane was an artist from County Limerick. She liked to paint about happy memories.

The circus performers in this painting are balancing on ponies, and the ponies are jumping over hurdles! Look closely: can you find the musicians in this painting? They are playing trumpets and trombones and one has a big bass drum! There is a big crowd of people cheering, but Finola has not used a lot of detail for their faces because they are far away. The ringmaster stands in the middle wearing white gloves and holding a long whip!

Let’s Play!

Imagine that you have joined the circus! 

Imagine that you are a clown.

How would you make people laugh? 

What jokes or movements can you make?

Jot down your ideas and perfect your act.

Put on a show for your family

Use imaginary props or make your own

Make tickets and a poster

Put on a show for your favourite toys or your family

Can you imagine your own circus?

What magic and mayhem, skills, thrills, fantastic feats and extraordinary spectacle can you conjure!

Use imaginary props or make your own

Make tickets and a poster, then put on a show for your favourite toys or your family

Let's Draw

Create your own circus characters 

Will you draw…

acrobats, beautiful ponies with ribbons, spinning plates, stilt walkers, Batman, a tattoo booth, trick cyclists, unicycles or the smallest bicycle in the world, a hair-raising high wire, a troupe of mice, clowns with canons, cowboys, a team of ants, all sorts of animals, or insects in a minuscule circus, skilful jugglers, a trapeze artist on a swing high above the crowd, giant hula hoops, dancers, tiny dogs doing tricks, face painters, a ringmaster or ringmistress in a top hat, drummers and musicians with trumpets, tumblers, a magician, stunts, motorbikes, a circus train, a strong man or woman lifting huge weights?
Hoseplay one

Horseplay!

Make a horse from things that you find in your house.  

Your horse could be small: use tinfoil, tear, scrunch, squeeze press into shape (see the photos above and below for inspiration).

No tinfoil? Cut out the shape of a horse from card in the recycling bin, use wooden pegs for legs!

Don’t forget, you can share your own Talking Pictures creations with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag
#crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

Hoseplay 2

Let's Move!

Imagine that you are a circus performer riding your beautiful pony!

Canter around in a circle to warm up!

Jump over pretend hurdles!

Jump through large hoops, maybe the hoops are on fire!

Slow down just a little so that you can carefully stand on your ponies back.

You will need to lift your arms in air to keep your balance, try moving like a bird. You might wobble but that is ok!

As you move feel the circus spotlight on your face and listen to the trumpets.

Lift one leg forwards in the air forwards then backwards, then swap legs!

You might do some handstands or cart wheels!

Lift your leg up to your head, you are flying!

Bow as the audience gives you a big cheer!

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Talking Pictures Week 3: Miniature Family Portraits

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday. 

About the artwork

This is a very small painting, called a miniature, of a man from the 19th century. He is wearing his best suit, he has nice furry sideburns and carefully combed hair but we do not know his name.

Miniature paintings were made before the invention of photography, they are paintings that you can hold in the palm of your hand. Miniature portraits were given as a special gift to a family member. They were placed in a locket, a watch cover or a little box so that they were easy to carry when travelling.

Miniatures were painted on ivory, made from elephant tusks, vellum which is calfskin, metal and even old playing cards! Sailors and soldiers gave their families miniature pictures of themselves so that they could feel close to their family when they were away.

Let’s Play!

Can you give our miniature friend a name?

Draw an extremely small house for our miniature friend!

Can you imagine miniature rooms with tiny furniture?

Would he like to read a miniature book or have a plate of miniscule food?

Imagine our miniature friend’s family, who does he live with?

Imagine the conversation he will have with his miniature family?

What does his tiny voice sound like?

Write a miniature tale about his day

Does he have a family pet?

 Portrait Miniature of Francis Roland as a Boy,  water colour on ivory
by Frederick Buck (c.1820). 

Make your own miniature family!

Missing your granny or grandad? Make a miniature grandparent! 

Take a picture and ask an adult to help you to send it to them, telling them all about miniatures.

Make your own miniature portrait, put it in a matchbox. Decorate the box with your initials and share with your family.

Shrink your family! Make miniature portraits of your family

Families are brilliant!
Can you make a miniature story telling us all about your brilliant family? Use a piece of paper no bigger than your hand. 

Families are annoying! 
Imagine that your family are tiny animals that you can put into a little matchbox. Draw your family as animals in miniature, what animals would they be?  Draw your animal-family having breakfast or watching your favourite television programme! 

Want to see more miniature portraits from our collection? Just click the ‘Collections’ tab and search ‘Miniatures’!

Don’t forget, you can share your own Talking Pictures creations with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag
#crawfordartgalleryhomelife.

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Talking Pictures Week 2: Food Glorious Food!

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday. 

About the artwork

This drawing shows a very hungry customer and a dancing chef! 

Alfred Bendiner (1899-1964) was an American artist who made lots of quick drawings full of fun and mischief. Alfred would sketch wherever he went, often in cafés and restaurants, using scraps of paper or menus. His restaurant drawings show silly waiters, plump chefs, fantastic food and all sorts of curious customers!

Let’s Play!

Feeling peckish?

Our table is set with a place just for you!

To work up an appetite, can you draw all of your favourite food on a very large plate?

Can you design an extravagant sandwich for our menu?

What ingredients will you use?

ham   sweets   cheese   lettuce   coleslaw  

custard   ketchup   jam   tomato   ice cream

sliced pan   sausage   peanut butter   spinach  

beef   butter   crisps   chocolate   cabbage   

banana   mustard   jelly   brussels sprouts  

salami   tuna   chocolate sauce   onion   broccoli 

Write about eating your extravagant sandwich!

You can dip into our word-soup below!

gobble   gobble    munch   munch    sip    slurp    chew   swallow

lick   warm   yummy  tummy   spoon   drip   drop   share  slow 

quick   dip   its mine!   slip   slop   smell   sniff   taste   tongue   teeth 

napkin   more!   full   wrap   tease   scrumptious   burp   smooth   light  

fluffy   crispy   delicious   nom-nom-nom   lumpy   table   salty   

HOT  plate   NO!   Wait   crunch   hiccup   spicy   sweet   MMMMM!!  

Want to keep playing?

Collect bits and bobs from around the house to design your own house menu!

Wool makes hairy spaghetti, for pretend eating only!
Collage scraps of fabric and cut out shapes from paper to create new dishes.
Beads and buttons in a saucepan make for a noisy, yet hearty stew.
Raid the recycling bin for this and that!
If you have access to a garden, whisk up some mud pies in old containers and decorate with a garnish of leaves and stones.

Bon Appetit!

Follow and use #crawfordartgalleryhomelife to share your creations and see others on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram!

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Talking Pictures Week 1: Rhino

Talking Pictures for Children 

Talking Pictures is an online resource for children and their adults based on artwork from the Crawford Art Gallery Collection. We will share creative prompts for happy talk and play every Wednesday.

About the artwork
This printed artwork was made by Jan De Fouw, a Dutch designer and illustrator who made his home in Ireland in 1951. He loved to draw animals and delighted audiences with his light-hearted cartoons and magazine illustrations.  

What is a print?
A print is a design or pattern transferred from one surface to another, think of a shoe print, a hand print or a potato print! Jan De Fouw made his picture of a rhino on a small sheet of metal, this was covered with ink and pressed on paper.

Let's Play!

Can you give our rhinoceros a name?

What did he eat for breakfast this morning? 

Take our rhinoceros for a walk. 

Where do you think he lives? 

In a tropical forest, a swamp, a big muddy puddle…

Draw some animal friends to keep our rhinoceros company?

Can you write a rhino poem that makes you laugh?

Use words that rhyme with rhino

radio domino Eskimo puppet-show
big-toe long-ago tomato Picasso  
very slow potato Mexico indigo
river-flow volcano pistachio
I know!   Banjo   slow   tip-toe  
hello bright-yellow    eye-shadow  
bingo   borrow   mango   hero  
jumbo   swallow             

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