Crawford Art Gallerypermanent collection

Porphyro
Porphyro tries to assure his love this is no dream my bride, my Madeline"
(Design for The Eve of St. Agnes Window)
c.1923
Irish School
Pencil, watercolour and gouache on paper
33.5 x 12cm

97-P

Gibson Fund acquisition 1924
IX

So, purposing each moment to retire,
She linger´d still. Meantime, across the moors,
Had come young Porphyro, with heart on fire
For Madeline. Beside the portal doors,
Buttress´d from moonlight, stands he, and implores
All saints to give him sight of Madeline,
But for one moment in the tedious hours,
That he might gaze and worship all unseen;
Perchance speak, kneel, touch, kiss—in sooth such things have been.

"The Eve of St. Agnes"
John Keats

 














Harry Clarke
1889–1931
Irish School

Clarke may be described as Ireland´s major Symbolist artist, whose synthesis of literary, musical, poetic and imagined visual images draws on a wide range of eclectic, sometimes obscure sources to produce an entirely original and idiosyncratic vision. This is as firmly rooted in the Yeatsian Celtic Revival and National Romanticism of late 19th/early 20th century Ireland as in European Symbolism, Decadence, and Art Nouveau of the same period, with the unusual extra dimension of consummate technical skill in stained glass. Clarke´s ability to express his art through one of the most demanding of crafts, in a modern yet traditionally inspired Arts and Crafts idiom, gives his work a sumptuous richness and depth usually only evoked, rather than realised, by his contemporaries. In Ireland, this fusion of vision and skill was only achieved by his contemporaries, Wilhellmina Geddes and Michael Healy, of An Tur Gloine stained glass studio in Dublin, and, more recently, by the two
contemporary Cork-based artists, Maud Cotter and James Scanlon.